Spot shooting?

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#21
Do any of you have any experience with it? Mason is dragging me back into 3D shooting. Ross Co Bowhunters have expanded their facilities to accommodate indoor 3D shooting through the winter. They can shoot out to 50 yards. We have gone the last two Sunday afternoons and have enjoyed it immensely. They also host spot shooting on Monday evenings, so we went down to give that a try. I'd never done it. It seems to be an entirely different game. Huge diameter shafts, light weight bows, magnifying scopes and intricate stabilization systems. Crazy gear. Impressive shooting too. Mason and I just took our hunting set ups. Lol. I could see how a person could get hooked on this type of shooting but I'm not sure I want to make the investment. Here is a pic of my first round. Anyone else ever done this type of shooting?
My local archery range does this also but they have a rule that if your arrow breaks the line of a lower scoring ring, that’s the score that you get...so shooting fatties would be a handicap at this range. They do mix it up a bit so on some shoots, the line break would give you a higher score. They do this to make it interesting....or frustrating, depending on your setup.
 
#22
That brings back memories.

Me and the old man used to shoot a lot at 'Solon Archery'. Must have been early 90s. I was a little man.

I think it was every Tuesday night and whenever else we would go.

It was a fun ride. A lot of 20 yard indoor spot shooting(don't remember referring to it as that, but I assume it's the same thing). We'd travel around a little bit shooting random tournaments. I do remember being in the 'cub' class if that makes sense.

Long story short, a horrible; and I mean horrible bout with Target Panic/anxiety ended all that jazz. It was really bad. I went from being pretty f'n good, to not even being able to hit the damn target.

To this day, I still deal with TP if I'm not careful.

It was a major glitch in my psyche. Unfathomable. Argh.

I turned into a trap and sporting clays maniac after all that.
I remember having target panic when I was younger also. I went from shooting masters scores ( top class- above AA) to not being able to hit a target at 20 yards. It was like a total mental collapse when shooting....to worried about where the arrow was going to land instead of worrying about my form. I finally beat it by going up to the target and standing about three feet in front of it. I would nock an arrow, close my eyes, draw back and aim in the direction of the target (being only three feet away, there was no way I could miss and didn’t have to worry about where my arrow landed). Then I would concentrate only on my form, touching the release and keeping my arm up for five seconds after the shot. I would then nock another arrow and repeat...not caring if I was grouping or not, just caring about form. After 20 minutes of this, I’d go to ten yards and shoot with my eyes open, again only caring about form. After a while, I’d go back to 20 yards, then 30, and so on. Took me about 6 months of this routine to beat it. Now it never creeps into my mind. I would never wish target panic on anyone, it really messes with your confidence.
 

finelyshedded

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#23
I remember having target panic when I was younger also. I went from shooting masters scores ( top class- above AA) to not being able to hit a target at 20 yards. It was like a total mental collapse when shooting....to worried about where the arrow was going to land instead of worrying about my form. I finally beat it bygoing up to the target and standing about three feet in front of it. I would nock an arrow, close my eyes, draw back and aim in the direction of the target (being only three feet away, there was no way I could miss and didn’t have to worry about where my arrow landed). Then I would concentrate only on my form, touching the release and keeping my arm up for five seconds after the shot. I would then nock another arrow and repeat...not caring if I was grouping or not, just caring about form. After 20 minutes of this, I’d go to ten yards and shoot with my eyes open, again only caring about form. After a while, I’d go back to 20 yards, then 30, and so on. Took me about 6 months of this routine to beat it. Now it never creeps into my mind. I would never wish target panic on anyone, it really messes with your confidence.
Everybody in our club had done that more than a few times! It’s a great way to reset and get back to muscle memory,mental focus,form and restore your confidence. Glad you brought it up.

I shoot righthanded but I’m left eye dominant so I had to squint my left eye a bit cuz there was no way in hell I was going to learn how to shoot left handed and I still do it to this day. This was the biggest hurdle I had to overcome in my youth but it seems to have worked out. I never really had much bouts with TP and sympathize with those that do. I believe using the 2 finger Stan with back tension was a big reason why.

If I had a club/range close to home I’d prolly get back into it a little. It’s something I really enjoyed doing.
 

brock ratcliff

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#24
Speaking of a Stan.... I bought one for Mason a couple months ago. That kid worked his tail off trying to get the hang of it. He would shoot great groups but always to the left. He got frustrated and quit so I took it over. Same thing with me. I finally got it adjusted properly and absolutely love it now, shooting better than ever. I can't get Mason to even try this t now. I'm sure if he ever does, I'll have to buy another. :)
 
#25
Ive always found the point of impact shifts to the left (for a right handed shooter) a little when switching from wrist release to a hand held.
I am left eye dominate but right handed like your finelyshedded. I shoot my bows, rifles and handguns right handed. Its something i have struggled with when i was younger but doesnt bother me now.
 
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brock ratcliff

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#27
The shift left was substantial, like 4" at 20 yards! I could see the arrow sweep to the left as if shot from a bow w the centershot off It was maddening but I have it fixed now. I'm away from home currently but just told him via the phone to go shoot it. I suspect I'll never have the chance to shoot that release again. Apparently he just ordered a Scott Longhorn w a wrist strap. First key to archery success, but more crap! :)
 

jagermeister

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#28
The shift left was substantial, like 4" at 20 yards! I could see the arrow sweep to the left as if shot from a bow w the centershot off It was maddening but I have it fixed now. I'm away from home currently but just told him via the phone to go shoot it. I suspect I'll never have the chance to shoot that release again. Apparently he just ordered a Scott Longhorn w a wrist strap. First key to archery success, but more crap! :)
So what was the "fix?"
 

brock ratcliff

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#29
I adjusted the timing on the release. It is very light now. I suspect it demanded too much rotation to fire before. It no longer does. Mason is still not a fan. He launched one into the woods while trying to draw. Lol.
 

finelyshedded

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#30
I smacked myself a half dozen times trying to learn how to draw with it but once I figured it out I never had a problem again. Basically learnt how to draw with my index finger and thumb pinched together.
 
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#33
Any pictures of your setup Brock?
Nothing special to see J. Mine looks like a hunting rig with a long stab, that's all. I will have a new set of strings (proline) next week, CBE single pin sight w 4x Zeiss lens and a specialty peep w a clarifier added soon.

We shot 20 3D indoor Sunday. Known yardage, 40 and under. ASA scoring. I can't shoot a lower 12 ring to save my life. I shot a 206, which I hope to improve on with a better sighting system---- I can't see worth a crap anymore. Mason's score did not reflect how well he shot, he started out a little rough due to a sight issue. He shot a 196, I think. He was flat impressive after the first four targets.

We need to set up a couple bows for spot shooting if we are going to do that. I can't see my sight on the yellow background and we are over bowed with too small diameter shafts. We shot ok last night considering, but I was in the mid 290s, and Mason was a couple points behind. The fella I was paired up with shot a 312, and honestly his shots were not very pretty. He was shooting 24s, and the scoring difference between us was all in shaft diameter. Size really does matter. :)
 
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#35
Ric, do these guys shoot really low poundage and heavy arrows? I didn't ask any of them, but I swear some of the arrows I saw shot were not going 150 fps and if they were shooting farther than 20 yards, it would never get there. I need to ask some of these guys what they are shooting and why. It's a totally different game than I'm used to for sure.
 

Beentown

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#36
Ric, do these guys shoot really low poundage and heavy arrows? I didn't ask any of them, but I swear some of the arrows I saw shot were not going 150 fps and if they were shooting farther than 20 yards, it would never get there. I need to ask some of these guys what they are shooting and why. It's a totally different game than I'm used to for sure.
Yes, for sure. 40-60 pounds and telephone poles with ultra-high FOC.
 

finelyshedded

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#37
Brock, I imagine that’s pretty popular. I shot the 2018 Easton XX75’s out of my Jennings TStar set at around 47-50 pounds. Shooting as much as we did fatigue could bring on mental and physical errors so I found shooting at that weight was pretty doable. I do remember when shooting the 5 spot targets that it was beneficial to make your first few flights/rounds your best cuz blowing up the x ring helped focusing on it easier. I can’t not remember was we chronographed our bows at way back then. I wanna say 180-190 but I could be wrong.
 
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#38
I'll promise you this; I've got a longbow that I've chronographed at 170 that will out run any of the bows I saw last night in a hurry! Lol.
Thanks for the information guys. I've got a few bows hanging around that I might setup for spot shooting. I don't see it becoming my thing, but it may help to pass the winter next year.
 

Gordo

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#39
This can get expensive!

But it'll be worth it!

Don't know you that well Brock, but I know your going to do everything in your power to out shoot everyone at the range. You got that competitive nature.

And Gotta fend off the boy in the process! I'm waiting for that kid to have his 'I have arrived' moment and you may never out shoot him again!

Good stuff! I got great memories with my pops doing the same exact shit. We where as green as it gets. I also remember the group of guys that we'd cross paths with in doing it. Just straight up good peoples.

I need to get me a compound again and get back into the shooting game.

This time around I'm going to have a big ass block to shoot at with my eyes closed so I can bury the hatchet on the TP once and for all
 
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#40
Target panic... the dreaded demon.

Honestly Gordo, if you can take advice, it's the easiest thing in the world to overcome. Mason battled it for the last couple months. He's at the age where he has to hear the same thing several times before he actually listens. He was to the point he could not get his pin close to the spot, let alone settle on it. I got tired of him whining about it after having told him how to stop the issue countless times, so I told him a little louder. He heard it that time...

Here it is; AIM... do not think "shoot now". Just aim, finger completely off the trigger if necessary. AIM
Second, watch your arrow in flight through the peep. It's physically impossible to actually do that, but it will seem like you can if you try. By doing this last part, shooting is way more fun as you actually see the arrow in flight and it takes away the urge to get the bow out of the way. It makes a perfect follow through...and that's something I don't see many archers doing these days. It should appear your arrow arches up and intersects with your sight. That makes for a confident shot, and confidence is what keeps panic at bay.