The 102 2018

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2,086
201
63
Fleming
#1
This is my 2018 thread devoted to our 102 acres in Athens County. We decided to plant Soybeans in one of the plots this year. We started by brushhogging a couple weeks ago and then spraying after that. Today, after struggling to get up the hill because of all the rain, we were able to disc, fertilize, till, seed and cover the one acre plot. We even created a second watering hole in this plot. As bad as the day started it turned out great. The other half acre plot on top will be turnips. We have a one acre clover plot in the bottom.

We will probably overseed the beans with a fall plot once the leaves turn yellow. The beans will be left standing.

Soybean plot
IMG_2218.jpg
 

giles

*Supporting Member*
13,507
793
113
Highland county
#4
If the deer let it go to pod. Which I don’t see as a bad thing, because that means the deer are eating it!

Did you cage any off the see the difference? I’ve never done anything like this, but if I was to, I’d want to see the difference in the growth.
 
2,086
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63
Fleming
#6
I will put a seclusion fence up when it starts to grow.
From what I’ve read...take that however you want....the RWWP beans are supposed to produce more bean pods than eagle seeds and also be shatter resistant so they will last longer into the late season.
 

Iowa_Buckeye

Junior Member
836
64
28
Linn County Iowa
#7
Wonder why farmers aren't planting RWWP beans if they are better then regular old Pioneer and/or Monsanto???
Don't fall for the marketing Spencie!!! Farmers depend on the best engineered beans for bushel/acre, and disease/drought/shatter resistance for their lively-hood.

The 'bin beans' we plant every year produce hoards of pods and hole them through winter (what are left anyhow.....).

Save your beer money!!! :D:ROFLMAO::p
 
Likes: giles
#8
I believe the Eagle and Tyrone varieties are made for forage more than bean pods. When I planted the Tyrone a couple of years ago they were over 6' tall in places. They still produced a good many pods as well.
 
2,086
201
63
Fleming
#9
Eagle is for forage. These are more for late season.
I get what you are saying IB. I think they mean more shatter resistant in cold weather. Farmers typically have harvested long before then.
 

jagermeister

*Supporting Member*
14,051
205
63
Ohio
#11
The Eagle managers mix contains four different types of beans. They are a forage heavy bean but produce plenty of pods into the late season too. I'm looking forward to hearing how these RWWP beans work out for you! The Eagles are great (way better than standard ag beans IMO) but they sure are expensive.
 
Likes: Jackalope

"J"

*Supporting Member*
32,194
789
113
Columbiana County
#12
The Eagle managers mix contains four different types of beans. They are a forage heavy bean but produce plenty of pods into the late season too. I'm looking forward to hearing how these RWWP beans work out for you! The Eagles are great (way better than standard ag beans IMO) but they sure are expensive.
What would be the cost difference per acre Jim?
 
#16
So if you’re doing an acre or two and it’s heartier seems like an expense that would be worth it?

If they give you more bang for the acre then it may be. Also to really do it right and get production, you need to properly lime and fertilize the ground. That costs more per acre than the seed unless your ground is really good.
 
2,086
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Fleming
#20
Even though this plot is on top of the ridge there are areas that hold water. When we first created the plot we used the tractor bucket to dig out a low lying area. It stays full of water. It’s about 10’ x 10’ and 2’ deep. There’s another spot that holds water and doesn’t allow good growth so we dug it out too. It’s about 2 feet deep and 8’ x 8’.