The TOO Book Club

Welcome to TheOhioOutdoors
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Login or sign up today!
Login / Join

jagermeister

*Supporting Member*
14,051
205
63
Ohio
#41
Good shit, Jesse. Off Balance sounds like a good one.

I've found a new level of enjoyment in books lately, but not by reading... By listening. I downloaded and purchased a subscription through Audible and I love it. Sitting down and reading a book is not for me. No matter how interesting it is, I get bored and my mind drifts off to other things. I find myself going back and rereading over and over again. Not so with audiobooks. For some reason, I can maintain attention and stay more interested than ever before. I drive a lot, and so this, on addition to a few podcasts, has been a God-send.

Recently I've been listening to The Frontiersmen, by Allen Eckert. So far it's the best book I've ever "read" and I get absolutely lost in it. I'm about 2/3 of the way through. It's 30-plus hours long so it's got some serious meat and potatoes. In contrast, I listened to Tribe recently (another great one) and it was only about 2 hours long.

I'm really digging this Audible app. I think it's really going to help me gain some knowledge that was previously outside of my reach.
 

bowhunter1023

Administrator
Staff member
Site Admin
39,779
797
113
Appalachia
#42
Reading the Frontiersmen was laborious to say the least! I also enjoyed reading Tribe. My drive time has been reduced, so I just fill it will podcasts. I can't get myself to listen to audiobooks as I feel the practice of reading is important, but as I get more pressed for time, I find myself considering it more and more.
 
#43
I really enjoy Eckerts style of writing. It is historical fiction yet it follows very closely to the true events. I also like it contains footnotes and references. Some of the understanding of events have changed with more updated research. There also a number of historical inaccuracies particularly surounding the greathouse family. His books are pretty unbiased on the subject of whites vs Indians and he doesn't hide atrocities committed by either side.

RG Robertson's writing is similar to Eckert's but is more novel like than historical fiction.

I am reading John Fox JR's novels. They are classics the center around Northern Kentucky's Appalachian region.
 
Last edited:

jagermeister

*Supporting Member*
14,051
205
63
Ohio
#44
I really enjoy Eckerts style of writing. It is historical fiction yet it follows very closely to the true events. I also like it contains footnotes and references. Some of the understanding of events have changed with more updated research. There also a number of historical inaccuracies particularly surounding the greathouse family. His books are pretty unbiased on the subject of whites vs Indians and he doesn't hide atrocities committed by either side.

RG Robertson's writing is similar to Eckert's but is more novel like than historical fiction.

I am reading John Fox JR's novels. They are classics the center around Northern Kentucky's Appalachian region.
I agree. I think Eckert does a great job of "filling in the blanks." Listening to the audiobook, I miss out on all the valuable footnotes that you mention. So once I'm finished listening, I plan on picking up a hard copy and going back through.
 

bowhunter1023

Administrator
Staff member
Site Admin
39,779
797
113
Appalachia
#45
The footnotes are what make That Dark and Bloody River so hard to read. I cannot, not read them, so I'm am constantly flipping to the back. It's a shitton of information to absorb in a choppy manner of reading, so it defines laborious...
 

jagermeister

*Supporting Member*
14,051
205
63
Ohio
#46
Still loving this Audible app

I'm currently listening to this one, American Nations. I just started it today. So far, it's a little dry, but interesting. I'm sure it will get better.


Boone, by Robert Morgan, was an excellent book that I would definitely recommend. I listened to it immediately after finishing The Frontiersmen. Some of the historical accounts from both books overlap, but The Frontiersmen was kind of light on the Daniel Boone history... So this book, Boone, was a perfect follow-up and really filled in a lot of the blanks.


My most recent completed book, American Buffalo by Steven Rinella, may quite possibly be my favorite book so far. Definitely in the top two. It's two separate (but related) stories in one... A biological and ecological history of the bison, and one hell of a hunting story. Rinella tells the epic tale of his one and only buffalo hunt in a remote part of Alaska. He describes the adventure in such colorful detail that you can picture yourself right there beside him. And for those familiar with his Meateater podcast, his good ol boy humor translates in his writing as well. I found myself either smiling or laughing out loud multiple times during this book, which is pretty rare for me, a guy that has never been a bookworm. I can't recommend this book enough. For anyone who hunts, this is a must-read. Or is this case, listen.
 

Jackalope

Administrator
Staff member
Site Admin
27,714
660
113
#47
Thanks Jim. I'll have to give that American Buffalo one a listen in the truck during my commute.

I recently started reading "The Art of War For Managers.". It's a pretty good book that focuses more on the art in an effort to avoid war. Understanding why other managers and executives do what they do, how to align yourself strategically in partnerships and situations, how to lead situations to a desired outcome by strategic planning and strategy. Interesting to say the least. This is an area I really need to work on personally, I have a tendency to go from diplomat to nuclear strike pretty quick.

Screenshot_20180526-225728.png
 
Last edited:
Likes: bowhunter1023

jagermeister

*Supporting Member*
14,051
205
63
Ohio
#48
Ha! Diplomat to nuclear strike. Same here! Type D personality by the sounds of it. I too could use some work on that. I'll have to add that one to my list.
 

Jackalope

Administrator
Staff member
Site Admin
27,714
660
113
#49
Ha! Diplomat to nuclear strike. Same here! Type D personality by the sounds of it. I too could use some work on that. I'll have to add that one to my list.
I'm more a Type A personality with regard to drive and determination. The issue comes in when I'm met with oposition, I will attempt the diplomatic route once but if the obstacle persists I go straight to obvious conflict mode and take them head on. This is great when dealing with problems or tasks, bad for dealing with people. I need to learn to continue the diplomatic route with a better stratgic plan to achieve my desired outcome. 100% of the time in todays business environment the person who is being obviously combative loses, regardless if they are right about the issue.
 

bowhunter1023

Administrator
Staff member
Site Admin
39,779
797
113
Appalachia
#50
Sun Tzu's version of Art of War was a good read, so I added that one to my Amazon list Joe!

I read Rinella's book on buffalo a couple years back. I also endorse it as a "must read". He's both a great author and orator.
 

jagermeister

*Supporting Member*
14,051
205
63
Ohio
#51
I'm currently listening to this one, American Nations. I just started it today. So far, it's a little dry, but interesting. I'm sure it will get better.
Well, unfortunately, I was wrong. This one in fact did not get any better. While at times it was interesting, the book as a whole was dry, difficult to follow, and poorly written. The author jumps around way too much for me. I found myself losing interest frequently... If I was reading the physical book version, there's no way I would have finished it. If you're somewhat of a political nerd this book might be for you. But that ain't me.