Turkey Killing Tip

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Killed a one this morning in that mess, they will usually gobble less and stay on the roost longer. They like being in the open a little more,jmo but I would say the can't hear well just as we can't because of the bigger drops from the trees and they get out in the open to see . The wind is the hunters worst enemy you can't hear them and they can't here you. These are just my opinions, good luck hope this helps. Anytime in the woods is better than sit ten in the house, you can't get them sit ten in the recliner.
 

rgecko23

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Just as an FYI, make sure you hit that small vitals area. I looked over my footage frame by frame, and I hit the bird perfectly broadside, but missed the mark by a couple inches low. Stinkin sucks. I imagine its coyote bait now, cause it was hurt for sure. But they can run a pretty good lip while still injured.
 
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Hit 'em high, watch 'em die. And is one reason I no longer hunt them with a bow. To each their own, but if things were based on my experiences, bows would not even be legal for turkey hunting. Done right they die quickly, its just too easy to do it a little bit wrong.
 

mrex

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They head for fields ric. They still gobble and do turkey stuff hahaa. But wind is a different story. Rain I don't mind...wind, fugg it better go to Kroger
This has been my experience also. Turkey's head for open spaces when it's raining. Rain dulls their senses and since their primary defense is eye sight, they like to get to areas where they can see approaching danger. Rain is the perfect condition for blind hunter / field sitters.
 

mrex

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Hit 'em high, watch 'em die. And is one reason I no longer hunt them with a bow. To each their own, but if things were based on my experiences, bows would not even be legal for turkey hunting. Done right they die quickly, its just too easy to do it a little bit wrong.
I have a handful of conditions, each with an exception, for the people who hunt with me. First, we don't shoot at moving targets unless it's a second shot and the bird is hit. Second, we don't shoot Jake's unless you're a novice hunter. And third, we don't hunt them with archery equipment, except for one place that's inside the city limits where you can't discharge a firearm.

I read a study done years ago by the Mississippi DNR about the percentage of archery shot turkeys that go un-recovered and the number was astounding.
 

hickslawns

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Having never even having a turkey interact vocally or show itself visually (during season), I will gladly take my shotgun. Seeing how we had 1, yes 1 bird taken on opening day in my county, I need every advantage I can get. lmao
 
Hicks my buddy shot the only bird in Allen county Monday. I finished up yesterday with a 22 lb 10.5inch beard and just over 1 inch spurs. Will get pick on here when I figure how. My buddy and I have had 3 deal breakers this year we should both be tagged out but that's the way it goes. And you asked bout the 100 acre woods ? Not sure which woods your talking bout the one southwest of grubb in auglaize county or the big thicket Kendrick woods. We are hunting north of the big thicket clear to ft Amanda we have beat on a lot of doors this year for permission,cuz there are a lot of birds but they are scattered and even more so since last Saturday they have had lots of pressure we've seen several other hunters out this way.
 

MK111

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I haven't read all 10 pages of this post so please excuse if this tip has been mentioned before.
Always place your Tom and hen decoys facing you. That way a Tom won't hang up further out thinking the hen will see him and will come over to him.
Plus the Tom coming in will only see the spreaded tail of your Tom decoy and will want to look into the face of the decoy giving you a good chance at a shot.
 

mrex

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I haven't read all 10 pages of this post so please excuse if this tip has been mentioned before.
Always place your Tom and hen decoys facing you. That way a Tom won't hang up further out thinking the hen will see him and will come over to him.
Plus the Tom coming in will only see the spreaded tail of your Tom decoy and will want to look into the face of the decoy giving you a good chance at a shot.
Excellent tip. Positioning is far more important than what brand or how realistic the decoy looks. Gobblers often pay little attention to an upright standing hen. I've watched strutting toms leave a group of hens to investigate a hen decoy that's squatted in a submissive breading position.
 

hickslawns

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Hicks my buddy shot the only bird in Allen county Monday. I finished up yesterday with a 22 lb 10.5inch beard and just over 1 inch spurs. Will get pick on here when I figure how. My buddy and I have had 3 deal breakers this year we should both be tagged out but that's the way it goes. And you asked bout the 100 acre woods ? Not sure which woods your talking bout the one southwest of grubb in auglaize county or the big thicket Kendrick woods. We are hunting north of the big thicket clear to ft Amanda we have beat on a lot of doors this year for permission,cuz there are a lot of birds but they are scattered and even more so since last Saturday they have had lots of pressure we've seen several other hunters out this way.
Congrats on getting your second bird. That is quite an accomplishment in our county. One IS an accomplishment around here. The woods I was thinking of is south of Dughill. Can't remember the name of the road to its north. Fella that owned it passed away and I guess the kids/grandkids manage it now. My Aunt and Uncle lived out that way for decades. Always used to drive by hunters on our way out to Christmas or Thanksgiving.
 

mrex.0

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Excellent tip. Positioning is far more important than what brand or how realistic the decoy looks. Gobblers often pay little attention to an upright standing hen. I've watched strutting toms leave a group of hens to investigate a hen decoy that's squatted in a submissive breading position.
I hunted with a couple friends earlier this week up in Michigan and was able to film a text book example of this. The gobbler sprints across the field to a live hen, then leaves her to investigate our decoys. There's a sapling partially blocking my view just before the shot but you can see to the left a David Smith submissive hen.

https://youtu.be/A95wCLkVIIk