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Non-Resident Youth License

#1
I knew NR licenses were increasing this year. The one thing I missed in the report is that they did away with the NR Youth license being discounted. They have to pay the same as an adult. Just an FYI for those NR who takes out their kids. I will have to skip supersizing for a couple of weeks. :smiley_bril:
 
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#3
If I still lived in North Carolina and I would probably have their grandparents go in with them and buy licenses from Ohio and just say they will with their grandparents.
 

giles

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#6
I agree with Rick. Spend the money and teach kids the right way, don’t cheat the system.

Like cspot said, no more supersizing. Plenty of ways to cut corners to find a few more dollars.
 
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#7
I agree with Rick. Spend the money and teach kids the right way, don’t cheat the system.

Like cspot said, no more supersizing. Plenty of ways to cut corners to find a few more dollars.
I don't have worry about it obviously, but I wonder how many people will do that are originally from Ohio and still have family in the state?
 
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#8
Ummmm thats kinda against the examples we try and set. Not to mention what it teaches the kids.
I am not trying to derail this thread, everybody has their own personal level of justification for certain actions and behaviors, I will honestly say this would be a toss up, especially depending on the price and the actual # of times my boys would be hypothetically hunting.
 
#9
I am not trying to derail this thread, everybody has their own personal level of justification for certain actions and behaviors, I will honestly say this would be a toss up, especially depending on the price and the actual # of times my boys would be hypothetically hunting.
Actually it is a horrible idea. If a NR would do that and then take the harvested deer back across state lines you would be in violation of the Lacey Act. That is a federal offense. Not worth the risk.
 
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#10
Actually it is a horrible idea. If a NR would do that and then take the harvested deer back across state lines you would be in violation of the Lacey Act. That is a federal offense. Not worth the risk.
I'm just curious I really have no dog in this fight, a non-resident can't leave the (ohio)state with a complete carcass, it has to be boned out?
 
#11
I'm just curious I really have no dog in this fight, a non-resident can't leave the (ohio)state with a complete carcass, it has to be boned out?
No. If a NR used a Resident license then the deer that is harvested would be illegally taken. WHen you take it across the state line, you then violate the Lacey Act. Penalty could be pretty severe.

http://corporate.findlaw.com/law-library/the-lacey-act-18-u-s-c-42-16-u-s-c-3371-3378.html

The Lacy Act provides authority to the Secretary of the Interior to designate injurious wildlife and ensure the humane treatment of wildlife shipped to the United States. [18 U.S.C. §42 and 16 U.S.C. §§ 3371-3378.] Further, it prohibits the importation, exportation, transportation, sale, or purchase of fish and wildlife taken or possessed in violation of State, Federal, Indian tribal, and foreign laws. In 2008 the Lacy Act was amended as a part of the 2008 Farm Bill to strengthen and improve the enforcement of Federal wildlife laws and improve Federal assistance to the States and foreign governments in the enforcement of their wildlife laws. The act along with the amendments provide an important tool in the effort to gain control of smuggling and trade in illegally taken fish and wildlife.

Background

The Lacey Act was originally passed in 1900 to outlaw interstate traffic in birds and other animals illegally killed in their state of origin. It was aimed at the so-called "pot hunter" who killed large amounts of wildlife for sale. Similarly, the Black Bass Act was passed in 1926 to outlaw the interstate transport of illegally taken black bass. Today, the Lacey Act has been amended several times and now combines the Lacey and Black Bass Acts into a single comprehensive statute to provide more effective enforcement of State, Federal, Indian tribal, and foreign conservation laws protecting fish, wildlife, and rare plants. It is a vital tool where the Federal government can aid other governments in enforcing their own conservation laws.

With the exception of the marking offenses, none of the offenses under the Act stand on their own. There must first be a violation of an underlying Federal, State, foreign, or Indian Tribal law, treaty, or regulation relating to fish, wildlife, or rare plants.

Prohibited Activities

It is unlawful for any person to import, export, transport, sell, receive, acquire, possess, or purchase any fish, wildlife, or plant taken, possessed, transported, or sold in violation of any Federal, State, foreign, or Indian tribal law, treaty, or regulation. [16 U.S.C. § 3372.]

It is unlawful for any importation of live wild animals and birds to occur under inhumane and unhealthful conditions.

It is unlawful for any person to make or submit any false record, account, or identification of any fish, wildlife, or plant which has been, or is intended to be imported, exported, sold, purchased, or received from any foreign country; or transported in interstate or foreign commerce. These are commonly referred to as marking offenses.

Under the Act, Federal agents are authorized to seize any wildlife which they have reasonable grounds to believe was taken, possessed, transported, or imported in violation of any provisions of the underlying laws.

Penalties

Both criminal and civil penalties can be assessed, depending upon the nature and type of the violation. A civil penalty can be as much as $10,000 if there is evidence that the violator should have known that the fish, wildlife, or plants were taken, possessed, transported, or sold in violation of any underlying law. [16 U.S.C. §3373.]

Criminal penalties fall into two categories. For a felony offense, a maximum $250,000 fine per individual and $500,000 per organization, and/or up to 5 years imprisonment for each violation of the Act can be assessed. A misdemeanor offense carries a maximum $100,000 fine per individual and $200,000 per organization, and/or up to 1 year imprisonment.

Forfeiture: Vehicles, aircraft, vessels, or other equipment used during the commission of the crime may be forfeited to the government in cases involving felony convictions. Any fish, wildlife, or plants involved in violations of the Act are also subject to be forfeited. [16 U.S.C. § 3374.]

Highlights

Rewards can be paid to any person who furnishes information leading to an arrest, criminal conviction, civil penalty assessment, or forfeiture of property.
The maximum civil and criminal penalties have been increased and now include a felony punishment scheme which targets commercial violators and international traffickers.
When the Lacey Act was amended in 1988 it was determined that the sale and purchase of guiding and outfitting services and invalid licenses and permits constitutes a sale and/or purchase of wildlife.
Violations involving fish, wildlife, and plants are all subject to the same penalties.
Restrictions have been relaxed on the marking of packages and containers of fish or wildlife shipped in interstate or foreign commerce to accommodate current industry practices.
There is a strict liability forfeiture provision for all fish, wildlife, plants, vessels, vehicles, aircraft, or other equipment used in a violation of the Act, except marking violations.
There are provisions for importing certain plants and animals, but such an importation must be accompanied by a import declaration.
Summary

The Lacey Act is the primary tool that the United States has in the protection of wildlife. It combats trafficking of wildlife, fish and plants. While proper importation is possible with a U.S. Customs declaration, smuggling is strictly prohibited. There are severe penalties for violating the provisions of the Act.
 
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#12
No. If a NR used a Resident license then the deer that is harvested would be illegally taken. WHen you take it across the state line, you then violate the Lacey Act. Penalty could be pretty severe.

http://corporate.findlaw.com/law-library/the-lacey-act-18-u-s-c-42-16-u-s-c-3371-3378.html

The Lacy Act provides authority to the Secretary of the Interior to designate injurious wildlife and ensure the humane treatment of wildlife shipped to the United States. [18 U.S.C. §42 and 16 U.S.C. §§ 3371-3378.] Further, it prohibits the importation, exportation, transportation, sale, or purchase of fish and wildlife taken or possessed in violation of State, Federal, Indian tribal, and foreign laws. In 2008 the Lacy Act was amended as a part of the 2008 Farm Bill to strengthen and improve the enforcement of Federal wildlife laws and improve Federal assistance to the States and foreign governments in the enforcement of their wildlife laws. The act along with the amendments provide an important tool in the effort to gain control of smuggling and trade in illegally taken fish and wildlife.

Background

The Lacey Act was originally passed in 1900 to outlaw interstate traffic in birds and other animals illegally killed in their state of origin. It was aimed at the so-called "pot hunter" who killed large amounts of wildlife for sale. Similarly, the Black Bass Act was passed in 1926 to outlaw the interstate transport of illegally taken black bass. Today, the Lacey Act has been amended several times and now combines the Lacey and Black Bass Acts into a single comprehensive statute to provide more effective enforcement of State, Federal, Indian tribal, and foreign conservation laws protecting fish, wildlife, and rare plants. It is a vital tool where the Federal government can aid other governments in enforcing their own conservation laws.

With the exception of the marking offenses, none of the offenses under the Act stand on their own. There must first be a violation of an underlying Federal, State, foreign, or Indian Tribal law, treaty, or regulation relating to fish, wildlife, or rare plants.

Prohibited Activities

It is unlawful for any person to import, export, transport, sell, receive, acquire, possess, or purchase any fish, wildlife, or plant taken, possessed, transported, or sold in violation of any Federal, State, foreign, or Indian tribal law, treaty, or regulation. [16 U.S.C. § 3372.]

It is unlawful for any importation of live wild animals and birds to occur under inhumane and unhealthful conditions.

It is unlawful for any person to make or submit any false record, account, or identification of any fish, wildlife, or plant which has been, or is intended to be imported, exported, sold, purchased, or received from any foreign country; or transported in interstate or foreign commerce. These are commonly referred to as marking offenses.

Under the Act, Federal agents are authorized to seize any wildlife which they have reasonable grounds to believe was taken, possessed, transported, or imported in violation of any provisions of the underlying laws.

Penalties

Both criminal and civil penalties can be assessed, depending upon the nature and type of the violation. A civil penalty can be as much as $10,000 if there is evidence that the violator should have known that the fish, wildlife, or plants were taken, possessed, transported, or sold in violation of any underlying law. [16 U.S.C. §3373.]

Criminal penalties fall into two categories. For a felony offense, a maximum $250,000 fine per individual and $500,000 per organization, and/or up to 5 years imprisonment for each violation of the Act can be assessed. A misdemeanor offense carries a maximum $100,000 fine per individual and $200,000 per organization, and/or up to 1 year imprisonment.

Forfeiture: Vehicles, aircraft, vessels, or other equipment used during the commission of the crime may be forfeited to the government in cases involving felony convictions. Any fish, wildlife, or plants involved in violations of the Act are also subject to be forfeited. [16 U.S.C. § 3374.]

Highlights

Rewards can be paid to any person who furnishes information leading to an arrest, criminal conviction, civil penalty assessment, or forfeiture of property.
The maximum civil and criminal penalties have been increased and now include a felony punishment scheme which targets commercial violators and international traffickers.
When the Lacey Act was amended in 1988 it was determined that the sale and purchase of guiding and outfitting services and invalid licenses and permits constitutes a sale and/or purchase of wildlife.
Violations involving fish, wildlife, and plants are all subject to the same penalties.
Restrictions have been relaxed on the marking of packages and containers of fish or wildlife shipped in interstate or foreign commerce to accommodate current industry practices.
There is a strict liability forfeiture provision for all fish, wildlife, plants, vessels, vehicles, aircraft, or other equipment used in a violation of the Act, except marking violations.
There are provisions for importing certain plants and animals, but such an importation must be accompanied by a import declaration.
Summary

The Lacey Act is the primary tool that the United States has in the protection of wildlife. It combats trafficking of wildlife, fish and plants. While proper importation is possible with a U.S. Customs declaration, smuggling is strictly prohibited. There are severe penalties for violating the provisions of the Act.
Learned something knew today, I guess I won't buy my hypothetical non resident children, resident licenses after all
 
#13
LOL.

Here is a case that is actually similar to your hypothetical children.

Midwest USA Outfitters Operated By A Pennsylvania Man Found Guilty On 13 Counts Of Lacey Act Violations
DES MOINES, IA - On November 14, 2013, Rodney Eugene Hughes, a 63 year-old resident of Mayfield, Pennsylvania, doing business as Midwest USA Outfitters, Cantril, Iowa, was found guilty in federal court of seven counts of the unlawful sale and/or acquiring of deer, taken and transported in interstate commerce, announced United States Attorney Nicholas A. Klinefeldt. In addition, Mr. Hughes was found guilty of six counts of willfully submitting false information as to the licensing of said deer that was intended to be transported in interstate commerce. Penalties for said crimes include a fine not more than $250,000, imprisonment for not more than five years, or both.

The evidence produced at trial showed that Hughes owned and operated a hunting guide service in Southern Iowa known as Midwest USA Outfitters. In 2008, several non-resident hunters came to Southern Iowa to hunt with Midwest USA Outfitters. These hunters came knowing they did not possess a buck tag, but were told by Hughes that he would provide them with a resident buck tag. Hughes had relatives and friends obtain hunting tags and used these tags to place on the non-resident hunters’ kill. Hughes would then report or cause to be reported the tag information to the State of Iowa by inputting the tag number belonging to people other than the hunters. This is in violation of the Lacey Act, Title 16 U.S. Code Sections 3372 and 3373; in addition to Iowa State Code Sections 483A.1; 483A.26; 483A.38; and various Iowa Administrative Code Sections.

The investigation was conducted by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. The case was prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Iowa.

https://www.justice.gov/usao-sdia/p...sylvania-man-found-guilty-13-counts-lacey-act
 

Mooosie

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#14
I lived in Ohio all my life. I retired to Florida. I come north every year to hunt on a farm a own. I pay taxes on it every year. Since I’m a Florida resident now I have to buy a NR license to hunt on my own land. Ain’t life grand?


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#15
  • A nonresident landowner, and the spouse and children living with the landowner, may hunt on that property without a license, either-sex deer permit, antlerless deer permit, spring or fall turkey permit, Ohio Wetlands Habitat Stamp, or fur taker permit if the nonresident's home state allows residents of Ohio owning property in the nonresident's home state, and the spouse and children living with the Ohio property owner, to hunt without a license, deer permit, spring or fall turkey permit, wetlands habitat stamp, or fur taker permit. Mooosie Does Florida allow it?
 
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Bigslam51

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#16
I lived in Ohio all my life. I retired to Florida. I come north every year to hunt on a farm a own. I pay taxes on it every year. Since I’m a Florida resident now I have to buy a NR license to hunt on my own land. Ain’t life grand?


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The hell do you do, fly up and dump corn out of a 747? 🤣🤣
 

Mooosie

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#17
I was told by ODNR that an Ohio resident who does not live on his land may hunt it without a license. Out of state owners must buy a nonresident license.


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Mooosie

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#18
Bigslam51 I don’t have to dump corn out of an airplane, I run feeders year round


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Jackalope

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#19
I was told by ODNR that an Ohio resident who does not live on his land may hunt it without a license. Out of state owners must buy a nonresident license.


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It depends on the state. If the state the person resides in also allows nonresident landowners to hunt without a license then that person can do the same in Ohio. Unfortunately for you Florida doesn't even have an exemption for resident landowners like Ohio does, much less for non-resident landowners. (With the exception of hunting Hogs in FL.) The issue isn't really Ohio laws that prevent you from hunting your land without a license, its Floridas laws.
 

Mooosie

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#20
Well in Florida since I’m over 65 I don’t pay for any state fishing or hunting licenses


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