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The TOO Book Club

bowhunter1023

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#21
Since starting this thread, I've read more books than I had read in the previous 32 years. Because I listen to so many podcasts, the pipeline for reads is pretty backed up and I have a new found desire to learn, so that keeps me plowing through a process I never really enjoyed until recently. Funny thing is the Kindle got me reading and I quickly decided I only liked it for reading in the blind and would rather read a real book at home. That said, here are the most recent reads after setting the goal of reading a book a month this year. Ironically enough, the book for January was The Goal. I read this in my Operations class in college and enjoyed it. It's a novel, but a text book. I didn't connect with the subplot of managing life and work when I was 20, I certainly do at 34. Also, I am working with manufacturers now and developing my own processes while I work to define how our program, and our team should be ran. Great read the second time around and I would highly recommend this book to anyone in manufacturing or process driven fields. I consider it an invaluable addition to my library and will certainly read it again.

I am rereading 7 Habits again as well. This was a requirement in college as well and I all but blew this one off back then. I engage frequently with a personal adviser who managed 350 people on 4 continents at one time as an executive level project manger. He also happens to be my dad's oldest and closest friend. Our relationship went south around the time I turned 16 when he began throwing noise my dad's way about my "renegade mannerisms". Took him the next 16 years to figure out I pretty much do my own thing, but that doesn't make me a loser. As we've rebuilt fences in recent years, he has given me some tremendous advice. He's a man who reads dozens of books a year and over 1K in his life, so when he says in order for me to be successful not just in business, but in life, I had better read 7 Habits and learn how to teach it on a graduate level. The plan is to reread this once through, then immediately dive back in with a highlighter and sticky tabs. I'm already seeing how this book drives points home MUCH deeper at 34 than they ever could have at 22. With the opening paragraphs, he dives in to "perception", which was a surreal moment for me given my recent lessons on this. Again folks, if you are looking to make positive changes in your life and learn new process to assist with that, this book is a must read.

The other monstrosity there is 600+ pages of historical readings on the clash between my Shawnee and Irish bloodlines in the place I call home. I'll read this on the side and do my best to only read it when I can full immerse myself in it. I wanted half my book to be on personal/process improvement, but the other half to be non-fiction historical readings. Eckert is one of my preferred authors in this genre and I love reading about events from this time period in the Ohio Valley. I'm born and bred Mid-Ohio Valley and have spent a lot of time on the banks of that historical river. We duck hunt spots I know were touched by the men of this era and that's always a cool connection with the places we inhabit. If you are looking for a good author specializing in great books of this nature, Eckert is one of the best in my novice opinion.

 
Likes: Stump

Hedgelj

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#24
Let's see, thankfully i had a lot of time to read recently.

Orvis fly fishing guide - my best friend is getting me into fly fishing and so i read it in between learning to tie flies.

The Red Circle by Brandon Webb - It was a decent book about a former Navy Seal who ended up their sniper instructor.

Day by day Armageddon Ghost run. It is the fourth book in the series and the first two are still the best.

Inside Delta Force by Eric Haney. Very good book and from some knowledgeable people i have met quite accurate in the information about selection and initial training.

Enforcing Home & Avenging Home by A American. Continuations of the series and good reads about an EMP type teotwawki situation in Florida.

The Name of the wind & the slow regard to silent things by Patrick Rothfuss. Book one and two of a GREAT fantasy series. I cannot wait until book three is released.

Liberty's last stand by Coonts was an interesting read about government overreach set in current day America and a potential scenario. It was good.

The 14th Colony by Berry. Interesting scenario about presidential succession but i didn't personally care for it.

Sentinel by Patrick Mcnamara was okay but nothing ground breaking about personal security type stuff.

Red Platoon was an AMAZING book about a MOH winner from Afghanistan.

Worth Dying For by Rorke Denver. A former SEAL on America today and how to dig us out of the cultural location we are in. I really agreed with almost all of it.

Navy SEAL Sniper by Webb and Glen Doherty (of Benghazi fame) It was a good book written about abode training and basics of shooting for a non shooter or non gun person.

Outlaw Platoon by Sean Parnell was another good read about the war in Afghanistan.

Animal Farm & 1984 classics and definitely applicable to aspects of today's society.

Paul Reveres ride by David Hackett Fischer. An amazing read about the events leading to April 17 1775. Used diaries and other ordinal writing of the people to give a different insight and a new idea on who shot the shot heard round the world.



 

bowhunter1023

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#26
Since starting this thread, I've read more books than I had read in the previous 32 years. Because I listen to so many podcasts, the pipeline for reads is pretty backed up and I have a new found desire to learn, so that keeps me plowing through a process I never really enjoyed until recently. Funny thing is the Kindle got me reading and I quickly decided I only liked it for reading in the blind and would rather read a real book at home. That said, here are the most recent reads after setting the goal of reading a book a month this year. Ironically enough, the book for January was The Goal. I read this in my Operations class in college and enjoyed it. It's a novel, but a text book. I didn't connect with the subplot of managing life and work when I was 20, I certainly do at 34. Also, I am working with manufacturers now and developing my own processes while I work to define how our program, and our team should be ran. Great read the second time around and I would highly recommend this book to anyone in manufacturing or process driven fields. I consider it an invaluable addition to my library and will certainly read it again.

I am rereading 7 Habits again as well. This was a requirement in college as well and I all but blew this one off back then. I engage frequently with a personal adviser who managed 350 people on 4 continents at one time as an executive level project manger. He also happens to be my dad's oldest and closest friend. Our relationship went south around the time I turned 16 when he began throwing noise my dad's way about my "renegade mannerisms". Took him the next 16 years to figure out I pretty much do my own thing, but that doesn't make me a loser. As we've rebuilt fences in recent years, he has given me some tremendous advice. He's a man who reads dozens of books a year and over 1K in his life, so when he says in order for me to be successful not just in business, but in life, I had better read 7 Habits and learn how to teach it on a graduate level. The plan is to reread this once through, then immediately dive back in with a highlighter and sticky tabs. I'm already seeing how this book drives points home MUCH deeper at 34 than they ever could have at 22. With the opening paragraphs, he dives in to "perception", which was a surreal moment for me given my recent lessons on this. Again folks, if you are looking to make positive changes in your life and learn new process to assist with that, this book is a must read.

The other monstrosity there is 600+ pages of historical readings on the clash between my Shawnee and Irish bloodlines in the place I call home. I'll read this on the side and do my best to only read it when I can full immerse myself in it. I wanted half my book to be on personal/process improvement, but the other half to be non-fiction historical readings. Eckert is one of my preferred authors in this genre and I love reading about events from this time period in the Ohio Valley. I'm born and bred Mid-Ohio Valley and have spent a lot of time on the banks of that historical river. We duck hunt spots I know were touched by the men of this era and that's always a cool connection with the places we inhabit. If you are looking for a good author specializing in great books of this nature, Eckert is one of the best in my novice opinion.

7 Habits is done and will be reread again, but this time I will be highlighting and tagging like I was reading a text book. I definitely understand the importance of this book now.

Because of my current employment situation and the soul searching it has required of me lately, I decided to forgo Eckert's novel for the time being and purchased The Art of Work: A Proven Path to Discovering What You Were Meant to Do by Jeff Goins. I think I can get through it yet this month to stay on track for a book a month in 2017. After that, I have 25 books in my Amazon cart, many in the personal development realm, so I will probably continue down that path for the time being.
 

jagermeister

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#27
I need to read this 7 habits book. Sounds like it's right up my alley. I wish I could get into reading books more though. More often than not, regardless of the topic, they fuggin bore me to death and I give up before they're finished.
 

bowhunter1023

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#28
I need to read this 7 habits book. Sounds like it's right up my alley. I wish I could get into reading books more though. More often than not, regardless of the topic, they fuggin bore me to death and I give up before they're finished.
This was me up until 18 months ago. I view it as a necessary evil now. What to grow and develop? You HAVE to read. And yes, you'll love 7 Habits. When my most successful mentor tells me it's the "single most important book you'll ever read", I take note. I'm only reading these days because I'm not happy with the status quo and books will help break me from that.
 

bowhunter1023

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#29
Finished the Art of Work last night and what a great read. Wasn't what I expected and honestly for most of the book, it had me more confused and lost than when I started. However the last line was on point and almost like he knew what I needed to hear. I'd recommend this to anyone interested in books from this type of genre.
 

MK111

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#30
Been busy reading this winter. Started on the 8 book series by Allan W. Eckert. I had read over the last 40 yrs several of the books but I started over from the beginning. To the best of my research there is a series of 6 books in The Winning of American. Plus The Dark and Bloody River Plus A Sorrow in Our Hearts. There maybe a Blue Jacket book and if so I'll get it.

1. The Frontiersman
2. Wilderness Empire
3. The Conquerors
4. The Wilderness War
5. Gateway to Empire
6. Twilight of Empire

7. The Dark and Bloody River-story of the Ohio River conflicts
8. A Sorrow In Our Hearts-the Life of Tecumseh

I've read the top 5 books plus The Frontiersman that I loaned to my brother.

If anyone is interested once I finish the last 2 books I plan to sell the entire set of 8 books for $150 plus shipping. Prefer to sell as a st of 8 only.
If no one has read this series it's something everyone in the OH-KY area should do. It happened here. Plus the books are written in a narrative writing based soley on history facts. Easy read.

 
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huntn2

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#32
It is a great book Jim. Definitely worth reading again at different stages of life. I am actually finishing it up again. Revisiting 14 years into my career and as a father, I am getting more from it then when I first read it.
 

bowhunter1023

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#33
I read it at 20 in college and again at 34 as a tenured professional and the father of 2. I will read it again too. My personal advisor says I need to be able to teach the book if I want to realize my true potential. I plan to work on that. Per him, it's the single most important book you'll ever read as a business professional and arguably, for anyone from any walk of life. I tend to agree.

 

huntn2

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#34
I read it at 20 in college and again at 34 as a tenured professional and the father of 2. I will read it again too. My personal advisor says I need to be able to teach the book if I want to realize my true potential. I plan to work on that. Per him, it's the single most important book you'll ever read as a business professional and arguably, for anyone from any walk of life. I tend to agree.
I concur.
 

bowhunter1023

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#36
The stack of books represents my 2017 reading list. My goal was reading 12 books in a year and I did it fairly systematically, one book a month. I'm trying a different approach to the same goal this year, reading multiple books at once. These 4 are my current reads. Really enjoying all 4 thus far. I also have a list loaded with books on Amazon, so there's plenty in the queue!
 

NWOHhunter

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#37
I have written some of these books down, I am reading "The boy who was raised as a dog" by Bruce Perry.

I am reading this because of work related training.

It's about how trauma affects the young brain and it's long lasting affects and how you can actually change some of the damage years later. It's pretty good so far!
 

nathan.luthman

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#38
If anybody here likes western book i highl recomend two writers.
The first is Louis L'Amour. He has wrote a ton of books but my favorite is the Sackett series. They are short quick reads that have kept me entertained for years.
The other is Larry McMurty. My favorite book of his is Lonesome Dove. It is a part of a series about a group of Texas Rangers and thier travels.
 

Quantum673

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#39
If anybody here likes western book i highl recomend two writers.
The first is Louis L'Amour. He has wrote a ton of books but my favorite is the Sackett series. They are short quick reads that have kept me entertained for years.
The other is Larry McMurty. My favorite book of his is Lonesome Dove. It is a part of a series about a group of Texas Rangers and thier travels.
Both are great authors. My all time favorite is L'amour. My dad had every one of his books and I remember reading them in my teens.
 

bowhunter1023

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#40
I'm reading multiple books at once this year rather than one a month, so its delayed the satisfaction of finishing a book for a while. Thankfully I finished 2 in the last week. Unstoppable is forgettable, but somewhat interesting if you're an MJ fan. Off Balance is a must read for any professional or career minded person. Fantastic information, perspective and tools to apply to your daily life. I highly recommend it.

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