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Barn lights

OhioWhiteTails

Senior Member
Supporting Member
8,043
178
Flatlands
Fellas, I'm looking to wire overhead lights inside the barn. Any information on what has or hasn't worked well for you would be greatly appreciated. Looking at lighting roughly 2200 square. ft.
 
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P8riot

Member
424
25
Carbon, In
I always check 1000bulbs.com and I recently ordered led bulbs for enclosed fixtures from Prolighting.com 3200 lumen enclosed rated outdoor bulbs. I cant speak to ceiling type lighting but it would depend on the height they will be at. Yet to cross that bridge. I did a bunch of research and I do know to stay away from the corn cob style. Those put light to the sides, but not enough down light. I went with 4000K. 3000K is yellowish and 5000K is more bluish like daylight they say. In a shop/garage 5000K is probably best. I didn't want the sterile 5000K for outdoor lighting but wanted more than 3000K. They say 4000K is like the color of the morning sun.

These led bulb companies can make all kinds of claims as to lumen per watt and lumen outout. A DLC rated bulb means the company had their claims tested and verified they meet their requirements. It also means each of their bulbs only minimally deviate from the claimed color. I have streamlight flashlights same models and one is way bluer than the other. DLC rated bulbs ensure that doesnt happen. That means they only use select leds that meet their color needs so your light wont look all mismatched. Cheaper bulbs may be different. Another rating to look at is the hour rating. What may seem like a good deal ciuld only have a life of 15,000 hours. A good bulb should have 50,000 hours. LED bulbs get hot. The higher the hour rating, the longer the electronic components will be able to withstand and dissipate heat.
 
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Sgt Fury

Sgt. Spellchecker
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Don’t know the lumens but they are about 48” long with two rows of bright LED’s. To be honest, I wish I had softer lights in the bar…they seem too bright after a few drinks. Four lights in the garage worked out perfect as it really lights everything up well. The garage part is about 35’x30’ and the bar is about 15’x30’.
 

P8riot

Member
424
25
Carbon, In
👆 Those are probably 5000K. Great for seeing projects, but as the guy with racks and no fish on the wall pointed out, they get taxing on your eyes.

Another thing to consider is the CRI. Color Rendering. Do they allow you to see true colors or do the bulbs skew natural colors by adding their color to things. The higher the rating the better.
 
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hickslawns

Dignitary Member
Supporting Member
38,331
235
NW Ohio
How high is your ceiling? If really tall ceilings it may change recommendations. I have a buddy who sells LED lights. They are cheap. Like $20/fixture cheap. I have 3 of the 4' and one 8' in my 20x20 garage and we could perform surgery in there. I have 8 or 9 of the 4' in my 24x36' shop and it is plenty of light. That is quite a bit smaller than your building though. His 8' lights really throw down though.i can get his info to you if you'd like. He is in Alger.
 

Floki

Junior Member
1,101
57
Well fugg this is enlightening,down here in these parts ya can get a chick and a red light…

Cheaper than Biden’s build back better program…🤣🤷🏼‍♂️

more bang for your buck.🤙🤙🤙🤙
 
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Isaacorps

Member
4,752
118
Columbus
Definitely go LED but stay away from the ones that have integral diode strips. When they go bad there’s nothing to replace, you gotta pitch the whole fixture. I would suggest fixtures that accept tube style “bulbs” like the old fluorescent style. You’ll have much more flexibility with brightness and lumens and have the ability to replace them should they go bad. For me, 4000k is the sweet spot for barn/shop lighting. I’d suggest anywhere from 100-150 lumens per sq ft in a barn. This varies depending on if you have finished ceilings and walls which will help reflect the light vs unfinished which will absorb more of the light. You can play with layout as your needs dictate.
 

Isaacorps

Member
4,752
118
Columbus
Definitely go LED but stay away from the ones that have integral diode strips. When they go bad there’s nothing to replace, you gotta pitch the whole fixture. I would suggest fixtures that accept tube style “bulbs” like the old fluorescent style. You’ll have much more flexibility with brightness and lumens and have the ability to replace them should they go bad. For me, 4000k is the sweet spot for barn/shop lighting. I’d suggest anywhere from 100-150 lumens per sq ft in a barn. This varies depending on if you have finished ceilings and walls which will help reflect the light vs unfinished which will absorb more of the light. You can play with layout as your needs dictate.
To clarify…by bulbs I mean LED tubes that are replaceable
 

OhioWhiteTails

Senior Member
Supporting Member
8,043
178
Flatlands
How big a hurry are you in? Bridgeport has just what Issac suggested and they're like $25 a piece. I can snap a pic of them tonight or tomorrow. I bought 4 for my barn, but it's only 900SF. I think they're 2,500 lumens, but could be 4K.
I'm gathering supplies for outlet runs while waiting on the final building inspection. I hope to be pulling wire this weekend. I have temporary lighting, so no big rush.