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The TOO Book Club

bowhunter1023

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Appalachia
Book #2 for the year is done. I enjoyed this book more than Extreme Ownership largely because it drives home the importance of balance and the principles are easy to relate to. Between the two, I can't imagine a better blend of leadership education.

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jagermeister

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16,598
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Ohio
Excellent, Jesse. I heard nothing but good things about that book and it's on my list of reads for this year as well.

I just finished Trail of Tears. From a historical standpoint, it was valuable. However I found it to be quite boring and difficult to follow. It just seemed like I was laboring to finish it. Pretty disappointing to be honest.
 
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Wildlife

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USA
Bloodontheleaves.jpg


From world renowned experts in hunting accident investigation comes an invaluable collection of cases—true, detailed, and sometimes chilling accounts of death and injury on the hunt. Covering incidents of all kinds and set in locations across the country, these cases not only read like impressive "crime scene investigations" but they also provide hard-learned lessons in hunter safety. A must-read for hunters and anyone fascinated by forensics.

https://www.amazon.com/Blood-Leaves-Hunting-Accident-Investigations_And/dp/158667157X/ref=sr_1_5?crid=1NNOM1U8YBOWH&keywords=blood+on+the+leaves&qid=1563472496&s=gateway&sprefix=blood+on+the+leav,aps,322&sr=8-5

I meant to put this in here a while back, but I forgot to do it.

I gave the book to my father-in-law after I finished reading it and he really enjoyed it 'TOO'!

I strongly recommend every hunter to read it.

It's well written and there's 30 different episodes or hunting incidents that most anyone can learn from whether you're a hunter or not.

I read the entire thing in a single day.

I just couldn't put it down once I got into it.
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BTW, this is an excellent thread!

I have some other books that I'll be suggesting at a different time.
 

DJK Frank 16

Senior Member
Supporting Member
9,284
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Hardin County
I have been filling up my commute and mowing time w/ Audible over the last few months. I have completed Getting Things Done by David Allen and Extreme Ownership. I have about an hour left of The Dichotomy of Leadership. GTD had a handful of valuable points that I took away, but I really enjoyed Extreme Ownership and The Dichotomy of Leadership. Not sure what I will start on next...
 

Chass

Active Member
2,177
52
The Hills
Eckerts Frontiersmen was an awesome read. That was the last book I read and I regret I didnt immediately start into it when I got it, I flew through it. I see the Ohio river daily, and l look at it completely different now.
Right now I'm reading Grant by Ron Chernow. It's a giant book and I'm about 10% done, it's been a good read, has kept my interest so far.
Read quite a few other good ones this year, the notables were Blue Jacket by Eckert, The Golden Spruce by John Vaillant, American Buffalo by Steve Rinella and 1776 by David McCullough.
 

bowhunter1023

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44,980
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Appalachia
Finished Traction, started Freakonomics. Traction is a fantastic read for any business person and borders on being a textbook. I suggest being ready to highlight, tab pages, and refer to it time and time again. Very practical, very applicable. Freakonomics is already extremely interesting 20 pages in and is something @Jackalope needs to read if he hasn't. About data and asking the right questions. I have the Lean Startup about 60% read at the moment now, too. It's a laborious read because it's mostly applicable to tech/software development. I do like his writing about minimally viable products and rapid iteration. "Fail fast. Fail often. Fail forward." is the genesis of the book.

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Isaacorps

Member
3,564
94
Columbus
Dustin, Grisham is my favorite fiction author, hands down. Jesse, That Wild Country is actually on my list, just ordered The Pioneers by McCullough so will probably tackle that next. The Last Narco is really good, a comprehensive account of the rise of Mexican cartels and El Chapo, specifically. It was written before his latest capture but is relevant, nonetheless.
 

bowhunter1023

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44,980
226
Appalachia
I recommend this to everyone here that's enjoyed recreating on public lands. Great read. Kenyon is exceptionally descriptive in his writing, which helps someone like me who has never been anywhere that he discusses in the book. If you've been there, then it'll certainly conjure up some great memories.

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