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Episode #4: Turkey Talk w. TripleA88

bowhunter1023

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Episode #4 can be found on YouTube LINK, Apple, Google, and Spotify!

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In this episode, we are joined by Alex Anderson from Clark County, Ohio. Alex and Joe have amassed a surplus of turkey hunting stories over the years and we barely scratch the surface of their history as a tag-team turkey hunting duo during this conversation. Among the topics of discussion are regular roosting locations, how habitat influences turkey hunts, our preferred tactics for sealing the deal on a lonely tom, and we recount a few of our favorite hunts along the way.

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bowhunter1023

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When you listen to this one, that fuzzy "tick" in Alex's audio is not your speakers. 😂

I could hear it while recording, but it wasn't bad enough to halt the "hobbit" train and try to troubleshoot a fairly minor issue.
 
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jagermeister

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55:00... Why are the turkeys in that area? SECURITY! In ag country, flooded timber is prime roosting habitat. Nothing gets close to the turkeys without them knowing about it. Up here, in areas where we have turkeys, they always roost above or very close to water.

Nice job fellers. Another great episode!
 

at1010

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Another great one! I was laughing at old Jesse shooting one while frying some eggs over easy!

My uncle was hunting farm one year, he texts me and says "man birds went tight-lipped, I am headed in" - an hour later he shows me a big Tom, dead. He shot the damn thing like 50 yards from the house. Saw it, snuck around back, and boom. Damn coffee was still steaming warm in the house when he got back! LOL!
 

Jackalope

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55:00... Why are the turkeys in that area? SECURITY! In ag country, flooded timber is prime roosting habitat. Nothing gets close to the turkeys without them knowing about it. Up here, in areas where we have turkeys, they always roost above or very close to water.

Nice job fellers. Another great episode!

That's the only thing I could think of also. Not just from humans but Raccoons, Coyotes, Foxes etc. While all of those can still get in there, the odds of the turkeys being ambushed is much less. Similar to the theory abut green briar thickets. The swampy area is far from what we traditionally think about being good nesting habitat, but I'm sure they could find a small spot of ground that is always dry, even when the heavy rains come and it creates big shallow flooded areas.

I have also theorized that it's because its never been messed with by farmers. Too wet means it has never been cleared for crop or hay production or timbered. The trees like cottonwoods and sycamores are big and expansive. Even the dry "wooded" habitat thats around has mostly been timbered. The problem is Clark county has such an epidemic of Russian olive or Amur honeysuckle that after you select cut the timber nothing valuable will ever grow back because the honeysuckle will take off and choke out seedlings. Even Buck creek state park that was cleared back in the 50s for the construction of CJ Brown reservoir is that way and they even tried replanting. Nothing in there but honeysuckle, locust, poplar, and wild cherry. The ground is not very biodiverse for forage either because everything gets choked out.
 

finelyshedded

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Really enjoyed this last episode guys! It’s crazy how fast the time flies while listening to your discussions. Great job Alex! Looking forward to your deer hunts as well...👍🏻

Great taste in sipping beverage Jesse...😜👍🏻
 
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Good job guys. Do have 2 comments about the turkey hunting.

1. My success has gone up since I have gotten more aggressive. I always tended to be too worried about bumping the birds and would setup too far back. I have found that it is better to get as close as you can. Occasionally that will bite you, but in my experience they are far more likely to come take a look if you are 100 yards away or less vs 200 yards.

2. Late morning has always been very good to me. If you find a bird answering you regularly after 9:30 or so, you can usually get him to come in. This usually is because the hens have left him to go to the nest. The one thing though that is true for me and likely most of us. With work and busy schedules, you tend to get alot less late mornings to hunt than you do that first hour in the morning.