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paper tuning

dante322

*Supporting Member*
5,050
498
100
Crawford county
#1
so whats the deal with paper tuning? I understand the principle of being able to have a visual representation of the arrow passing through the paper. but is it really possible to paper tune at home? or is it best to go to a pro shop? as a construction worker i have tons of blueprint size paper, and i'm sure i can fabricate some sort of frame but how does it work?
 

5Cent

Senior Member
Supporting Member
7,213
3,077
126
Huron County, OH
#3
so whats the deal with paper tuning? I understand the principle of being able to have a visual representation of the arrow passing through the paper. but is it really possible to paper tune at home? or is it best to go to a pro shop? as a construction worker i have tons of blueprint size paper, and i'm sure i can fabricate some sort of frame but how does it work?
It's an important part of tuning, but is not always necesarry in my eyes. If you have another set of eyes, at 20yrds, have them watch arrow flight. They will be able to tell any kick of the arrow and it will be evident in how the arrow enters the target, especially arrow to arrow.

I have always paper tuned, but the Diamond Black Ice did not even leave so much of a flight path to be seen at 20yrds. The pro at Fin did not want to even get out the paper. At 30yrds the flight is somewhat noticable, but if there was a tuning issue then you would be able to see it. I am a firm believer in being fully prepared, so by the sounds of it, you have the materials so what do you have to lose? If you feel you need to see what the arrow is doing due to some issues, then go to 5' and let her fly.
 

jagermeister

Dignitary Member
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15,238
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Ohio
#8
I used paper tuning first... got my nock point perfect and just close on the left/right... then went out and walk-back tuned the bow. Walk-back method really fine tunes the windage of the rest. My broadheads are now impacting right where my field points do.
 

rgecko23

*Supporting Member*
7,466
0
0
Massillon, Ohio
#10
Or you could just takea your block target or bag target and put a piece of tape down the middle of it. and find an aiming point, like at the top of the target, and shoot all your pins at that exact same point and see if any of them are going left or right?? the arrows should go down the target if I am thinking about it right
 

jagermeister

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Ohio
#11
Or you could just takea your block target or bag target and put a piece of tape down the middle of it. and find an aiming point, like at the top of the target, and shoot all your pins at that exact same point and see if any of them are going left or right?? the arrows should go down the target if I am thinking about it right
Almost... shoot the same pin at the same spot, going back 5 to 10 yds between shots. Each arrow will impact lower than the last one. If the rest is off to the right, the arrows will impact right-of-center... the further you go back, the further to the right. Obviously, the opposite is true if the rest is too far left. You could shoot all the different pins I guess... but I think it would be easier to see the variation if using the same pin. It's important that the sight is leveled with the bow properly, and that you are shooting with the bow level each time. Also, if you move your rest left or right, you're probably going to have to re-zero in at your starting yardage before walk-back tuning again.
 

formerbowhunter1023

Now Posts as Jesse..
0
2
0
SE Ohio
#13
what would be the major difference between using the same pin or your other pins? I think we are both on the same page though
I don't have the real reason why you use the same pin, but read all the walk back advice out there and they will tell you to use the same pin. My guess is that is relates to consistency and consistency is the name of the game when tuning your bow. When you think about it, why would you bother using other pins when all that matters is your left/right impact? If you use the same pin, that is a constant and the more constants you have in this equation, the better.

Maybe Milo or Brock can better answer the question...
 

jagermeister

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Ohio
#15
I don't have the real reason why you use the same pin, but read all the walk back advice out there and they will tell you to use the same pin. My guess is that is relates to consistency and consistency is the name of the game when tuning your bow. When you think about it, why would you bother using other pins when all that matters is your left/right impact? If you use the same pin, that is a constant and the more constants you have in this equation, the better.

Maybe Milo or Brock can better answer the question...
I think you nailed it there. I don't know the real reasoning behind it either, but all I've ever read on walk-back tuning is to use the top pin... and it works, so that's what I do.
 

Milo

Tatonka guide.
7,769
257
100
#16
its a vector thing. you want to see the variation at longer distances.. it establishes a pattern to build off off. If I had a drawing app i'd draw it out for you. i don;t so your screwed..HA Minor deviations are not noticable at short distances. as you step back the problems magnify themselves in left to rights. using the same pin rules out shooter error and inconsistant site picture. it works pretty well. i like to use aluminum tape on my target and draw a dark line in the center. the aluminum tape stick to the target and stays there.