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Permission getting tough

Darron

Junior Member
273
0
Dayton, Ohio
My buddy and I spent the day today beating on doors in an area we currently hunt. We had some owners in mind and also did a little free lancing as well if a spot looked "turkey." If I had to guess we beat on anywhere from 12-15 spots, not just any spots, but spots we have seen turkeys before. Out of the 12-15 spots we got 1 yes. The one yes a 58 acre property where we saw 3 strutters last year. It's half woods half pasture. To my surprise we got a hold of everyone we knocked at. That's a 6% success rate if my math is correct. Sure wasn't like that 10 years ago.
 

Curran

Senior Member
Supporting Member
7,506
115
Central Ohio
No question about it, finding spots to hunt by knocking on doors is tough. Out of the places you stopped at, any idea on how many had other hunters that already have permission?

Last year I started keeping a log with spots I wanted to target, then tracked the "no" vs. "yes" and my percentage was probably around 10% or so, but it seemed that most places that were "no" already had hunters. Either they hunted themselves, or a friend or family member did. Only a few said they didn't allow hunting on their land, and these spots are all primarily located within Urban zones.

I've already got another 10 or so spots on my list for this year that I'll be knocking on here before too long. My goal each year is to maintain my current spots, and get at least one new spot each year. But like you said, it's definitely getting tougher each year.
 

Darron

Junior Member
273
0
Dayton, Ohio
No question about it, finding spots to hunt by knocking on doors is tough. Out of the places you stopped at, any idea on how many had other hunters that already have permission?

Last year I started keeping a log with spots I wanted to target, then tracked the "no" vs. "yes" and my percentage was probably around 10% or so, but it seemed that most places that were "no" already had hunters. Either they hunted themselves, or a friend or family member did. Only a few said they didn't allow hunting on their land, and these spots are all primarily located within Urban zones.

I've already got another 10 or so spots on my list for this year that I'll be knocking on here before too long. My goal each year is to maintain my current spots, and get at least one new spot each year. But like you said, it's definitely getting tougher each year.

The owners that turned us down ALL had either family or friends hunting the property. You can't blame them. I own property and keep it to myself and family. I understand completely.

If you do get permission chances are someone else will be hunting it. That's just how it is.
 

RedCloud

Super Moderator
Super Mod
16,827
149
Somewhere OHIO
I only have a few places to hunt around here. The 2 places I hunt I wouldn't have been given permission on if not for the landowners knowing one another. It is amazing how word of mouth still works in the farming community around here.
 

Darron

Junior Member
273
0
Dayton, Ohio
I only have a few places to hunt around here. The 2 places I hunt I wouldn't have been given permission on if not for the landowners knowing one another. It is amazing how word of mouth still works in the farming community around here.

We got lucky with that as well. Several years ago we gained permission for one cattle farm that was 200 acres. We then went to his neighbor and told him he gave us permission so he let us hunt his 200+ acres. We then went to his neighbor and told him we hunt so and so property and he let us hunt. In a matter of 30 min we gained permission for 600+ acres. Gettng permission to one farm can sometimes lead to others.
 

hickslawns

Dignitary Member
Supporting Member
35,269
191
NW Ohio
Good luck in your search Darron. I am getting my ducks in a row in an attempt to eventually own my own slice of heaven. We have several properties, but none with any hunting land. One rental property we owe less than $3k so that will help. When you can use rent from multiple tenants to pay off the other one quicker it will help us. When they are both paid off, then I will start banking faster which will help us to buy the land we would like to own some day. I would really like to just write a check, but the reality of that happening is slim to none. If I can ever just "write a check" for a hunting property, I will probably be too dang old to be able to maintain it. lol
 

Darron

Junior Member
273
0
Dayton, Ohio
Good luck in your search Darron. I am getting my ducks in a row in an attempt to eventually own my own slice of heaven. We have several properties, but none with any hunting land. One rental property we owe less than $3k so that will help. When you can use rent from multiple tenants to pay off the other one quicker it will help us. When they are both paid off, then I will start banking faster which will help us to buy the land we would like to own some day. I would really like to just write a check, but the reality of that happening is slim to none. If I can ever just "write a check" for a hunting property, I will probably be too dang old to be able to maintain it. lol

There's nothing like owning your own property. I don't know what I would do if I didn't have mine, especially for deer season. It's nice waking up in the morning not having to rush and worry about someone beating you to your spot. If you do get to your spot and find someone one, they get a big kick in the arse:smiley_coolpeace:

With owning property comes headaches though. I have had my fair share of headaches with mine, especially when it comes to neighbors thinking they own everything in the county around them.