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Physical Asset Investments.

hickslawns

Dignitary Member
Supporting Member
37,599
212
NW Ohio
So what causes real estate/gold/silver to charge higher? Low interest rates. Fear. Distrust in fiat currency. Does this mean we should be doing our homework on crypto currencies? I'll admit they scare me. I know little about them. I've read a bit. Still feel like I know very little. Can't bring myself to invest in them. In theory though, they should be pretty darn safe. I just don't trust them. Lots of people putting money into them. Anyone have experience with them?
 

giles

Village idiot and local whore
Supporting Member
37,737
197
In a bar
Crypto doesn’t even seem real to me. Like spending money on a video game. I give you $20 and the game shows $200, just for start up. How does that work?

Enough people give up cash and the program gets rich. Like playing scratch offs to me on paper. Damn smart by whoever started it. Not like everyone will cash out. You just pay the few that do and let the rest keep giving you cash in trade of a computed number.

This is my uneducated view. I like cash...never looked into this other stuff. I ain’t trading a $5 bill for a $10 green monopoly bill.
 
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giles

Village idiot and local whore
Supporting Member
37,737
197
In a bar
But that $5 bill is only worth the "Full Faith and Trust" of the US Government.. If that falls on a worldwide stage the Monopoly money might have more value.
My world currency stops in my circle of people. I.E. “my world”

If America fails to that extent, none of this talk means a damn thing to any of us. We’ll be busy worrying about clean water, food and medical supplies. Not what virtual investments we’ve made.
 

Big Weff

Junior Member
1,035
78
Athens
Somebody posted something about the feds starting up some kind of crypto program for a nationally regulated crypto currency which is lunacy in my opinion on account of we can already just touch our phone or card to a machine to transfer funds. I think Joe said that the whole point of crypto was that it wasn’t federally regulated which I think we all agree with. My question is which existing cryptos are currently accepted as currency or publicly traded? I think bitcoin and etherium are obvious but there are so damn many now it’s hard to keep track. I did a search and all the info seemed pretty vague. Just seems like their could be a pretty big surge in existing cryptos with the U.S gov. throwing it’s hat in the ring.
 

bowhunter1023

Administrator
Staff member
46,789
249
Appalachia
I own Bitcoin, Cardano, Dogecoin, and Cardano. That's a far as I've taken it so far,but there another 8 that I could buy on one of my trading apps. The federally regulated side of the convo is ridiculous because it flies in the face of why crypto came to be.

I'm working on a deal with a Bitcoin mining outfit and they'd be able to pay us in Bitcoin and/or Ethereum if we could accept it.
 
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"J"

Bass Whisperer
Supporting Member
48,775
249
North Carolina
I own Bitcoin, Cardano, Dogecoin, and Cardano. That's a far as I've taken it so far,but there another 8 that I could buy on one of my trading apps. The federally regulated side of the convo is ridiculous because it flies in the face of why crypto came to be.

I'm working on a deal with a Bitcoin mining outfit and they'd be able to pay us in Bitcoin and/or Ethereum if we could accept it.
Can you enlighten me on what the mining thing is?
 
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Gern186

Senior Member
Supporting Member
9,222
156
NW Ohio Tundra
I own about 12 different cryptos right now. They have all basically went up and back down in almost a years time. Im not impressed with any of their performances as of yet. My thoughts were to buy several and diversify as much as possible. Im going to keep my initial investments in them for a while yet.
 

hickslawns

Dignitary Member
Supporting Member
37,599
212
NW Ohio
I bought BLCN. It owns a basket of about 20 different stocks which benefit in one way or another from crypto growth. Buying the picks and shovels seemed conservative and I didn't need to guess which crypto currency was going to take off. I've had it for maybe a year. It hasn't done much. Oh well. Not sure I'm ready to buy actual crypto yet.
 

bowhunter1023

Administrator
Staff member
46,789
249
Appalachia
I took the same approach as Chad and spread my money out. None are performing great, but I looked at this as a 30-year play. I didn't want to look back on crypto and see Apple, IBM, or Tesla and wish I had invested. My nominal investment now could be a windfall later, or one of the very few gambles I took with my money over time.

Can you enlighten me on what the mining thing is?
The group I'm working with consider themselves a "Digital Infrastructure" firm. Their business model is gaining access to mega-capacities of electricity where they then build a server farm. The servers are capable of running complex algorithms that can produce crypto outputs, blockchain results, or other "data center" type outputs. With Bitcoin, the computers "mine" the output by computing these algorithms which results in an output that's eventually "validated" and they get compensated for that validated output. They can also verify transactions using the same computers. This group partners with a Bitcoin trader who takes all their validated output and turns it into actual currency for them. If they wanted to shift gears and do blockchain encryption, they could do the same thing on those computers.

 
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triple_duece

Ragin Cajun.
7,866
144
There are problems with investment in things like precious metals and gems, coins, guns, art etc and that is storing them securely. Theft, fire, flood are real concerns and the cost of safes, security systems, insurance etc can eat returns. Also with things like guns you can’t ignore the risk of government regulations harming future values. If you do decide to invest in such things the best advise I’ve heard is buy what you like not just what you think is a good investment.

Real estate is a whole different animal, I’d look at real estate that cash flows. That covers your taxes and insurance. Rental property, farmland, timberland etc. Look just past where the current activity is and for property on busier roads that might become commercial corridors. Of course real estate is less liquid. But an auctioneer can turn it into cash in a couple months.
Everyone I know with no money problems owns one thing for sure……land. They can’t make more like other things and it never goes down. Being who we are in this group I’d have to agree w buying land w cash flows, look for cash crop or some type of government program that pays you not to plant. Can always hunt and do the things you love to do in the great outdoors.
 

Ohiosam

*Supporting Member*
10,923
166
Mahoning Co.
Here's a look at a site in Georgia. Let's say there's a 95% chance Ohio announces a similar project in the next 6-8 weeks 😉

This guy uses an abandoned paper mill hydroelectric plant for the energy to mine bitcoins.

 
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bowhunter1023

Administrator
Staff member
46,789
249
Appalachia
Lots of these mobile units are finding themselves on well pads burning flare gas to power natural gas generators. The market share for Bitcoin mining is evaporating by the second.
 

Bighoun52

Member
260
34
In the woods
One thing that I've been doing a lot of thinking about here recently is investment in inflation-proof non-market impacted liquidable assets. There are the typical commodities such as physical silver and gold that hedge inflation and do best in down markets. But I've also considered older Firearms as they seem to do very well when held on to for a couple decades. I would categorize these as any firearm that was made prior to the inclusion of plastic or polymer as materials. I know some here have hedged the inflation monster using firearms as an investment. , I've also considered undeveloped land but that seems to be hit-or-miss when the market makes downturn the liquidity due to purchasing restrictions and valuation of that land suffers.
From what I have seen with land it goes up in markets like now, and never really comes completely back down. Over time the usual increase is 2-3% a year on land. It’s not a lot but it’s an increase