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Pines falling SE Ohio

reffitt20

Junior Member
20
51
In SE Ohio. Meigs county to be more exact. In the last three years I have noticed a lot of pines falling down. I have heard about the concept of soil disturbances can lead to trees being affected and falling but I have seen a lot of pines in sections that are untouched. Has anyone else had this experience in the area? The tops of these hills have a lot of pines but at this rate in 20 years the woods is going to look a lot different.
Any information is appreciated.
 

"J"

Git Off My Lawn
Supporting Member
56,981
274
North Carolina
Yep, moist soil and wind have been the demise of a lot of pine trees. Personally, I have one close to my house which I want to take down. But I’ll need to have a service do because it’s close to the shed and within striking distance of the house.
 

CJD3

Dignitary Member
Supporting Member
14,642
201
NE Ohio
It’s simply a combination of poor timing. The shallow root ball combined with a wind storm and saturated ground is all it takes. The mast of pine needles catches the wing better than leaves. My grandfather planted hundreds of pines in the 1920’s. Some years I’ve had half a dozen go down, most years, none.

I’m waiting for the yard to dry up some here so I can deal with the latest casualty.

IMG_4247.jpeg

IMG_4246.jpeg
 

triple_duece

Ragin Cajun.
9,169
159
Pines have a very compact rootball that does not extend very far down which makes them prone to blow over. High winds and saturated soil is the perfect combo.
Idk, our pine trees have a very long tap root. There is a few shallow roots that spread out but the tap root is what keeps the tree upright
 

at1010

*Supporting Member*
4,961
139
Yep @triple_duece those are likely long leaf pines in your area. Deep tap root system - Ohio is mostly red pines that folks are seeing tip over and these are a more shallow root system.

as for them dying - it’s just a function of timing and a shit pine market. Imo. They are getting old, big and no-one is harvesting them. I believe the pulp mill in Chillicothe that used to take a lot of pine for all of Ohio isn’t running anymore - so unless you find a few Amish to cut the pine, they will grow grow grow and fall over.

One of the best things that can happen is having them come down, get light to the forest floor and let regeneration start again. Imo.
 

SNIPERBBB

Member
83
17
Se ohio
Yep @triple_duece those are likely long leaf pines in your area. Deep tap root system - Ohio is mostly red pines that folks are seeing tip over and these are a more shallow root system.

as for them dying - it’s just a function of timing and a shit pine market. Imo. They are getting old, big and no-one is harvesting them. I believe the pulp mill in Chillicothe that used to take a lot of pine for all of Ohio isn’t running anymore - so unless you find a few Amish to cut the pine, they will grow grow grow and fall over.

One of the best things that can happen is having them come down, get light to the forest floor and let regeneration start again. Imo.
Come to think of it, I don't think I've noticed the smell from that plant as I go into Chillicothe in a while now
 

at1010

*Supporting Member*
4,961
139
Come to think of it, I don't think I've noticed the smell from that plant as I go into Chillicothe in a while now
I harvested 6 acres of red pine last year. After years of trying to sell it. I was told that once that pulp mill shutdown - it was about it for the Ohio market. That was like 5-6 years ago. I was lucky to find a few Amish to cut mine for me.
 
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