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Strategy questions

hickslawns

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NW Ohio
#1
Here is my scenario. I have some pictures of a couple decent bucks. I have seen the one on the hoof several times this summer. I haven't seen any on the hoof recently and pictures off trail cameras have not been consistent. The two guys hunting a neighboring farm have some recent pics of the big one I am after. They are setup right on the property line. What would you do? I know he is in the area. I just think he is avoiding my camera. Should I say screw the wind and try to hunt areas I have permission where I think the big boy is coming in which the other guys do not have access to? I saw the guy out there last year every single day. I really think he is going to burn out the area and make the big boy shift his woods or make him camp out in the corn. I am scratching my head on this one. If I hunt sparingly and leave my sections of woods/fields as safe havens I think I would actually have a better shot at this buck. I am leaning towards hunting some observation stands and then zeroing in on where I need to be. This guy has a couple fixed stands and I really think I could benefit from his hunting practices. What do you guys think? Stay back and hunt observation stands while he burns out his stands? Take the chance of him tagging the big boy in the first couple of days, but hope he pushes the big boy my direction as a result of his overhunting?
 

Jackalope

Dignitary Member
Staff member
32,195
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201
#2
Here is my scenario. I have some pictures of a couple decent bucks. I have seen the one on the hoof several times this summer. I haven't seen any on the hoof recently and pictures off trail cameras have not been consistent. The two guys hunting a neighboring farm have some recent pics of the big one I am after. They are setup right on the property line. What would you do? I know he is in the area. I just think he is avoiding my camera. Should I say screw the wind and try to hunt areas I have permission where I think the big boy is coming in which the other guys do not have access to? I saw the guy out there last year every single day. I really think he is going to burn out the area and make the big boy shift his woods or make him camp out in the corn. I am scratching my head on this one. If I hunt sparingly and leave my sections of woods/fields as safe havens I think I would actually have a better shot at this buck. I am leaning towards hunting some observation stands and then zeroing in on where I need to be. This guy has a couple fixed stands and I really think I could benefit from his hunting practices. What do you guys think? Stay back and hunt observation stands while he burns out his stands? Take the chance of him tagging the big boy in the first couple of days, but hope he pushes the big boy my direction as a result of his overhunting?
I say maybe figure out where you think that deer is going to go, then figure out his likely escape route and hunt it. The other hunter will likely push him out after a bit to where he feels safe. I say catch him getting the hell out of dodge.
 

Gern186

Senior Member
Supporting Member
7,914
2,671
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NW Ohio Tundra
#3
Be patient. The buck didn't get to be a shooter over night. He probably already has had a few run-ins with the other guy already the last few years and has him figured out. Just because they got a couple of pictures don't mean they have him tagged yet....probably night time pictures anyway which don't mean a lot to me. I would be willing to bet nobody will even see that buck the first few days of season.

Don't let other hunters change the way you hunt and your approach to your setup. You are always better to be more cautious starting out than to "blow your wad" the first week.

I would play it safe with some observational type stands and leave your bedding cover alone. You might try and catch him coming out of the corn in the evening along the edge, but don't rush anything here, no need to.
 
#4
I think you should go with your gut and keep the pressure low on your side of the woods, let them fug up their hunt and help you out with yours. I think you got the right idea backing off and watching from afar and seeing what results in their hunting style.
 
1,572
15
69
Swanton, Ohio
#5
Its tough to do but try not to let what other hunters are doing pressure you into making choices that you know are going to hurt your chances chances in the long run. Stick with your plan as much as possible.
 

Milo

Tatonka guide.
7,808
363
110
#6
hicks i agree with the others. one thing I am going to try this year is to hunt my way into where I want to be. it is a deep woods setup and I am going to try to work my way slowly into areas by using sticks and stands. keeping moving slowly towards my target area until I reach it and not disturbing whitetail buck deerz
 

hickslawns

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NW Ohio
#8
Gentlemen- This is why TOO is now home! I did not read a piece of advice from any of you that was not logical, sound, and great advice! Thank you!

If I had been glassing from a distance and had a regular pattern on one of the two I am after I would have a different perspective. These boys on the neighboring farm are baiting with corn (next to a corn field which is close to 100 acres??? duh) and I would guess you are right about the night time pics. I am actually thinking of trying something different for opening day. This would be to get in the stand at 330-4am and hunt a mobile location which I have not scouted much since winter. It is the end destination. I should have several hundred yards of trees to choose from between their funnel point into the woods and the actual bedding area. If I don't get him in their opening morning then I am steering clear of this area for weeks. Might not hunt it again until the late season actually. Otherwise I am leaning towards a couple observation stands which could actually present a bow shot.

Great thing here is I have the other farm which we have been working the last few weeks to prepare for hunting. I honestly haven't considered hunting the other woods much in the early season. Observation stands on that farm to make a plan of attack will give my main woods and target bucks some relief from constant pressure on my side of the woods. To reduce confusion, I will say our target bucks I have located are on Farm West. We have been working on Farm East the last few weeks. There are so many different stand locations available on Farm East which can be used as observation stands it will help me to not burn out Farm West. Farm West will see a couple early season days, of which the majority will be observation stands other than opening day. This farm to the west is going to be gold once the corn comes off. They will have little option but to walk out in the open or follow some narrow travel corridors along the creek. I am on the property with the narrow travel corridors. The neighboring farm does not offer much in the form of funnels. This will be my greatest asset when neighboring farmer's hunters burn out their stands. Especially if I lay low and don't hunt it too much!
 

formerbowhunter1023

Now Posts as Jesse..
0
2
0
SE Ohio
#9
What is the acorn situation for you? I can tell you that the deer down here have abandoned everything and went to the woods for acorns. My Live Cam went from 30-40 pics a night to nothing because the deer are not coming off the ridge in search of food. We took a drive last night and saw one deer in the fields. It's all about the acorns right now. Hunt 'em if you got 'em...
 

hickslawns

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NW Ohio
#10
Not a lot going on at Farm West. Farm east is just about nothing but oaks and walnuts. Too bad last year the guy had about 60 oaks timbered. Ended up losing the farm anyway. Neighbor told me he had 30 off his property and the guy that lost the farm had 60 last year. That is a bunch of oaks missing this year. Although there are a bunch of oaks on Farm East, most are 10-20' tall. They have acorns, but not too many. Farm West just doesn't have as many oaks. Most of the woods is along a creek bottom and there are mostly junk trees.