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2019-nCoV (Coronavirus)

hickslawns

Dignitary Member
Supporting Member
34,210
6,967
181
NW Ohio
Well now that more and more Cities, States, businesses and places are requiring masks "what u anti-maskers gonna do when they come for you"
Not go to those cities. I'm not 100% anti-mask. I'm 100% avoid places with people. If forced to go somewhere I cannot maintain distances then I wear a mask. Hello mother nature. You'll be seeing a lot more of me. Goodbye concrete jungle. I won't miss you.
 
Not go to those cities. I'm not 100% anti-mask. I'm 100% avoid places with people. If forced to go somewhere I cannot maintain distances then I wear a mask. Hello mother nature. You'll be seeing a lot more of me. Goodbye concrete jungle. I won't miss you.
I'm with you on that - only go where i have too and mask up and use hand santizer - uhm a age related high risker - stay safe - hard to believe we got more covoid deaths in Rhode Island then the country of Japan - wtf - hmmmmmmmmm
 

"J"

Bass fishing aficionado....
Supporting Member
40,204
12,642
205
Davie County, NC
I'm with you on that - only go where i have too and mask up and use hand santizer - uhm a age related high risker - stay safe - hard to believe we got more covoid deaths in Rhode Island then the country of Japan - wtf - hmmmmmmmmm
Dan, I’m still thinking the #’s are skewed. Anytime the government (local) can add too the coffers when submitting the coronavirus fatalities too offset their cost I’m wary. I’m always wary of the government for the most part as I’ve seen first hand their shadyness...
I hope some day the actual numbers come out. How many times have they adjusted the #’s downward over the last 6 months?
 
Likes: Geezer II
Dan, I’m still thinking the #’s are skewed. Anytime the government (local) can add too the coffers when submitting the coronavirus fatalities too offset their cost I’m wary. I’m always wary of the government for the most part as I’ve seen first hand their shadyness...
I hope some day the actual numbers come out. How many times have they adjusted the #’s downward over the last 6 months?
Yep i would like to know who is "they" - who has the deck and what up their sleeve
 

Jackalope

Dignitary Member
Staff member
31,890
10,253
191
Well now that more and more Cities, States, businesses and places are requiring masks "what u anti-maskers gonna do when they come for you"
Continue to exercise my ability to use a combination of common sense and individual freedom. I give two shits what some business or city council thinks.

The bottom line is this. As a species, we cannot hide from a virus. A mask is not a solution, it is a very very small part of a solution. There are only three ways this goes away.

1. Development of a vaccine and inoculation of 70-90% of the country. (Unknown if this is even possible as a vaccine for a coronavirus has never been created)
2. Robust testing and ability to quarantine everyone who may have come in contact with a positive person, coupled with our ability to close the national border until it has been eradicated in the rest of the world to prevent continued containment escapes and hot spots..
3. 70-90% of everyone gets it and develops a herd immunity (Unknown if it's even possible for our bodies to develop a lasting immune response)

#1 is a long long way away and it's not even known if it's possible.
#2 Is a pipe dream unless it is done extremely early on when the virus cluster is very small and capable of being contained. This is in every city, small town and county in America.
#3 If I get it today, or I get it in January the end result is no different. The faster this can be accomplished without exceeding hospital treatment capacity they quicker the at-risk groups will be at a lower risk. The quicker an immunity barrier can be established between the sick and the vulnerable the quicker the at risk populations can stop living a life of a recluse.

Healthy people in the low-risk groups who aren't wearing masks and are going about their lives should be hailed for their willingness to rapidly establish an immunity barrier and achieve herd immunity. They have made the personal decision that they're willing to risk it, willing to get sick, and willingly accept any potential consequences. This has been around long enough that the risks are well understood. The bottom line is without a vaccine or nazi like quarantines we need these low-risk people to get sick and get over it. The faster that these low-risk individuals get sick and establish an immunity the faster we move on from this. Everything else does nothing but drag it out and put the high-risk people more at risk.
 
Continue to exercise my ability to use a combination of common sense and individual freedom. I give two shits what some business or city council thinks.

The bottom line is this. As a species, we cannot hide from a virus. A mask is not a solution, it is a very very small part of a solution. There are only three ways this goes away.

1. Development of a vaccine and inoculation of 70-90% of the country. (Unknown if this is even possible as a vaccine for a coronavirus has never been created)
2. Robust testing and ability to quarantine everyone who may have come in contact with a positive person, coupled with our ability to close the national border until it has been eradicated in the rest of the world to prevent continued containment escapes and hot spots..
3. 70-90% of everyone gets it and develops a herd immunity (Unknown if it's even possible for our bodies to develop a lasting immune response)

#1 is a long long way away and it's not even known if it's possible.
#2 Is a pipe dream unless it is done extremely early on when the virus cluster is very small and capable of being contained. This is in every city, small town and county in America.
#3 If I get it today, or I get it in January the end result is no different. The faster this can be accomplished without exceeding hospital treatment capacity they quicker the at-risk groups will be at a lower risk. The quicker an immunity barrier can be established between the sick and the vulnerable the quicker the at risk populations can stop living a life of a recluse.

Healthy people in the low-risk groups who aren't wearing masks and are going about their lives should be hailed for their willingness to rapidly establish an immunity barrier and achieve herd immunity. They have made the personal decision that they're willing to risk it, willing to get sick, and willingly accept any potential consequences. This has been around long enough that the risks are well understood. The bottom line is without a vaccine or nazi like quarantines we need these low-risk people to get sick and get over it. The faster that these low-risk individuals get sick and establish an immunity the faster we move on from this. Everything else does nothing but drag it out and put the high-risk
 

Jackalope

Dignitary Member
Staff member
31,890
10,253
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Joe why the fuck are they telling us to wear masks - social distance - wash are hands and stuff - guess their trying tomkeep the economy going and have a slow herd drive instead of a stampeed
It's been a shitshow from day 1 and now it's also become political. Just a month ago they were telling us that masks were worthless for civilians and we shouldn't be wearing them. Why anyone would continue to believe anything they say as valuable advice is beyond me. They literally admitted to lying. I am also sure they are trying to drag this out as long as possible. 1 to make it a November issue and 2 for someone to develop a vaccine of questionable effectiveness that's potentially worth billions of dollars.
 
Natural infection

Herd immunity can also be reached when a sufficient number of people in the population have recovered from a disease and have developed antibodies against future infection. For example, those who survived the 1918 flu (influenza) pandemic were later immune to infection with the H1N1 flu, a subtype of influenza A. During the 2009-10 flu season, H1N1 caused the respiratory infection in humans that was commonly referred to as swine flu.

However, there are some major problems with relying on community infection to create herd immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19. First, it isn't yet clear if infection with the COVID-19 virus makes a person immune to future infection.

Research suggests that after infection with some coronaviruses, reinfection with the same virus — though usually mild and only happening in a fraction of people — is possible after a period of months or years. Further research is needed to determine the protective effect of antibodies to the virus in those who have been infected.

Even if infection with the COVID-19 virus creates long-lasting immunity, a large number of people would have to become infected to reach the herd immunity threshold. Experts estimate that in the U.S., 70% of the population — more than 200 million people — would have to recover from COVID-19 to halt the epidemic. If many people become sick with COVID-19 at once, the health care system could quickly become overwhelmed. This amount of infection could also lead to serious complications and millions of deaths, especially among older people and those who have chronic conditions.

How can you slow the transmission of COVID-19?
Until a COVID-19 vaccine is developed, it's crucial to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus and protect individuals at increased risk of severe illness, including older adults and people of any age with underlying health conditions.To reduce the risk of infection:

Avoid large events and mass gatherings.
Avoid close contact (within about 6 feet, or 2 meters) with anyone who is sick or has symptoms.
Stay home as much as possible and keep distance between yourself and others (within about 6 feet, or 2 meters) if COVID-19 is spreading in your community, especially if you have a higher risk of serious illness. Keep in mind some people may have the COVID-19 virus and spread it to others, even if they don't have symptoms or don't know they have COVID-19.
Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
Wear a cloth face covering in public spaces, such as the grocery store, where it's difficult to avoid close contact with others, especially if you're in an area with ongoing community spread. Only use nonmedical cloth masks — surgical masks and N95 respirators should be reserved for health care providers.
Cover your mouth and nose with your elbow or a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw away the used tissue.
Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
Avoid sharing dishes, glasses, bedding and other household items if you're sick.
Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces, such as doorknobs, light switches, electronics and counters, daily.
Stay home from work, school and public areas if you're sick, unless you're going to get medical care. Avoid public transportation, taxis and ride-sharing if you're sick.
This article is written by Mayo Clinic Staff. Find more health and medical information on mayoclinic.org.

For the latest updates on the COVID-19 pandemic, check the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. For more information and COVID-19 coverage,
 
It's been a shitshow from day 1 and now it's also become political. Just a month ago they were telling us that masks were worthless for civilians and we shouldn't be wearing them. Why anyone would continue to believe anything they say as valuable advice is beyond me. They literally admitted to lying. I am also sure they are trying to drag this out as long as possible. 1 to make it a November issue and 2 for someone to develop a vaccine of questionable effectiveness that's potentially worth billions of dollars.
It's sure starting to feel that way, Joe. Saw a recent headline that said this could last for five more years... Interesting - encompasses an entire 2nd term of Trump or democratic rule. Either way, it can be spun and capitalized on.
 

Jackalope

Dignitary Member
Staff member
31,890
10,253
191
Natural infection

Herd immunity can also be reached when a sufficient number of people in the population have recovered from a disease and have developed antibodies against future infection. For example, those who survived the 1918 flu (influenza) pandemic were later immune to infection with the H1N1 flu, a subtype of influenza A. During the 2009-10 flu season, H1N1 caused the respiratory infection in humans that was commonly referred to as swine flu.

However, there are some major problems with relying on community infection to create herd immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19. First, it isn't yet clear if infection with the COVID-19 virus makes a person immune to future infection.

Research suggests that after infection with some coronaviruses, reinfection with the same virus — though usually mild and only happening in a fraction of people — is possible after a period of months or years. Further research is needed to determine the protective effect of antibodies to the virus in those who have been infected.

Even if infection with the COVID-19 virus creates long-lasting immunity, a large number of people would have to become infected to reach the herd immunity threshold. Experts estimate that in the U.S., 70% of the population — more than 200 million people — would have to recover from COVID-19 to halt the epidemic. If many people become sick with COVID-19 at once, the health care system could quickly become overwhelmed. This amount of infection could also lead to serious complications and millions of deaths, especially among older people and those who have chronic conditions.

How can you slow the transmission of COVID-19?
Until a COVID-19 vaccine is developed, it's crucial to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus and protect individuals at increased risk of severe illness, including older adults and people of any age with underlying health conditions.To reduce the risk of infection:

Avoid large events and mass gatherings.
Avoid close contact (within about 6 feet, or 2 meters) with anyone who is sick or has symptoms.
Stay home as much as possible and keep distance between yourself and others (within about 6 feet, or 2 meters) if COVID-19 is spreading in your community, especially if you have a higher risk of serious illness. Keep in mind some people may have the COVID-19 virus and spread it to others, even if they don't have symptoms or don't know they have COVID-19.
Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
Wear a cloth face covering in public spaces, such as the grocery store, where it's difficult to avoid close contact with others, especially if you're in an area with ongoing community spread. Only use nonmedical cloth masks — surgical masks and N95 respirators should be reserved for health care providers.
Cover your mouth and nose with your elbow or a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw away the used tissue.
Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
Avoid sharing dishes, glasses, bedding and other household items if you're sick.
Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces, such as doorknobs, light switches, electronics and counters, daily.
Stay home from work, school and public areas if you're sick, unless you're going to get medical care. Avoid public transportation, taxis and ride-sharing if you're sick.
This article is written by Mayo Clinic Staff. Find more health and medical information on mayoclinic.org.

For the latest updates on the COVID-19 pandemic, check the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. For more information and COVID-19 coverage,
It is completely insane to say that if a person could not develop immunity from an live infection that a vaccine would somehow provide that immunity. There is not a vaccine in the world that provides a longer immunity than an actual infection. The whooping cough vaccine for example has a range of effectiveness between 4-20 years. An actual whooping cough infection provides immunity for 30-70 years. For them to say that we have to avoid infection because there's no evidence that it will provide immunity and using that assumption to justify the position that we should wait for the vaccine to provide immunity is compile shit. If our bodies cannot develop an immune response blueprint to a live virus there is no way in hell it will be able to develop one from a vaccine.
 
Likes: Blan37
It is completely insane to say that if a person could not develop immunity from an live infection that a vaccine would somehow provide that immunity. There is not a vaccine in the world that provides a longer immunity than an actual infection. The whooping cough vaccine for example has a range of effectiveness between 4-20 years. An actual whooping cough infection provides immunity for 30-70 years. For them to say that we have to avoid infection because there's no evidence that it will provide immunity and using that assumption to justify the position that we should wait for the vaccine to provide immunity is compile shit. If our bodies cannot develop an immune response blueprint to a live virus there is no way in hell it will be able to develop one from a vaccine.
Ho long for polio
 
Had a guy in a farm equipment dealer - customer - say this will all be over in November - yes sir all the sick people will rise up and walk out of the hospitals - -HO LEE SHIT - btw way i got too much time on my hands
It will be over if Biden wins because it will not be talked about or if it is the focus will change.

increase in numbers don’t mean shit, there is still a decline in deaths.
 

Schu72

Well-Known Member
3,690
648
97
Streetsboro
We really only know the short term, acute effects of COVID. It is very early and the long term effects are totally unknown. The few studies that are out there are already showing heart and cardiovascular damage, as well as, lung scarring. While I am happy to see the ICU admissions and death rates declining, death and full recovery are not the only outcomes.
 
Likes: hickslawns