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Alternate Heating Options - Pot Belly Stoves

Fletch

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#23
Ok - run it through the window or wall and up the side of the house. But for efficiency, put a heat reclaimer loop inside.
I like this idea... Less pipe inside where it can start a fire the better... Yeh Yeh I know they make special double insulated pipe for that... But I'm old fashioned... Remember even with a chimney outside gotta keep it clean and not burn wood such as pine...
 

giles

Village idiot and local whore
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#25
I like this idea... Less pipe inside where it can start a fire the better... Yeh Yeh I know they make special double insulated pipe for that... But I'm old fashioned... Remember even with a chimney outside gotta keep it clean and not burn wood such as pine...
You can burn pine. That’s the number one wood source in the north.
 

Fletch

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#28
Here's how mine looked... Originally there was paneling inside with concrete foundation behind.. So I removed paneling and my Dad and I did the brick work and base... Cut a hole in floor and added a vent directly above... That was one helluva stove... Should have taken it when I sold house...

IMG_20200222_095331.jpg
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Jackalope

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#32
Couple things bud. I know this is likely your forever home so a future sale might not be in the cards. However, if you ever do need to sell, the purchaser's insurance company will likely want a stove inspection and to see paperwork from a qualified installer. While you can go cheap on a stove there is nothing cheap about a chimney pipe that is installed to code. For example, if you go through a wall you have to put in a double-wall insulated box, if you go outside the house it has to maintain a minimum clearance from the siding depending in the material and pipe used being single or double-walled, extend a specific height above the apex of the house, capped with a spark arrestor etc.

You'll need to find the manufacturer installation instructions for combustable clearance for that specific stove as well as the NFC for standard clearances. Lots of variables, heat shield, wall material, floor material, hearth size, pipe clearance from wall etc.

The material for the chimney alone can cost you over a grand to do it to code.

Here is the one I did at my house. To take advantage of the minimum clearances I built a noncombustible air-gapped heat barrier. I placed cement board on the wall, then metal studs on their side, then cement board, and finished with Italian slate. This posed its own challenges like heat certified thinset and grout. Aka, more cost

The vent at the top and bottom allows the heated air inside the barrier to escape because it creates a cool draft intake at the bottom and hot air escapes from the top. This keeps the interior face cooler. The intake and exhaust size has to be a certain coverage area based upon heated face size. This allowed me to place the stove within like 9 inches of the nearest combustable which would have been the face of the original sheetrock wall.

20180828_192513.jpg
 
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giles

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#33
Couple things bud. I know this is likely your forever home so a future sale might not be in the cards. However, if you ever do need to sell, the purchaser's insurance company will likely want a stove inspection and to see paperwork from a qualified installer. While you can go cheap on a stove there is nothing cheap about a chimney pipe that is installed to code. For example, if you go through a wall you have to put in a double-wall insulated box, if you go outside the house it has to maintain a minimum clearance from the siding depending in the material and pipe used being single or double-walled, extend a specific height above the apex of the house, capped with a spark arrestor etc.

You'll need to find the manufacturer installation instructions for combustable clearance for that specific stove as well as the NFC for standard clearances. Lots of variables, heat shield, wall material, floor material, hearth size, pipe clearance from wall etc.

The material for the chimney alone can cost you over a grand to do it to code.

Here is the one I did at my house. To take advantage of the minimum clearances I built a noncombustible air-gapped heat barrier. I placed cement board on the wall, then metal studs on their side, then cement board, and finished with Italian slate. This posed its own challenges like heat certified thinset and grout. Aka, more cost

The vent at the top and bottom allows the heated air inside the barrier to escape because it creates a cool draft intake at the bottom and hot air escapes from the top. This keeps the interior face cooler. The intake and exhaust size has to be a certain coverage area based upon heated face size. This allowed me to place the stove within like 9 inches of the nearest combustable which would have been the face of the original sheetrock wall.

View attachment 96005
Good call. I know my plans are to install it so that I can tie into in the future on the main floor. So I plan to do mine right. Also thinking mine will turn into a firebrick stove on the outside of the house.
 

Bowkills

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#35
Fisher Stoves r awsome. im a mason so I'm naturally anti metal chimneys. I built mine as a 1st year apprentice around 15yrs ago and still using it which is a bit scary watching any 1st year cub laying brick. If u plan on living there for a long time don't go cheap whatever you use......ull sleep better at night. I've had a few oh shit moments over the years with a stove malfunction (magnet damper stuck) and forgetfulness (drank to much). I think the single wall would melt down 1st if things got bad.
 

Fletch

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#36
As Bowkills and Joe have said DO IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME... Don't cut corners on something as dangerous as fire... That's why I wasn't TOO kean on your temporary setup of a pot belly stove...Not sure about Ohio but here in Jersey building codes suck... Just about have to get one to replace a single board on your deck... Have a fire and the insurance company would love to find out you cut corners... Alot of insurance companies demand that the stove your putting in be UL (or whoever) approved...
 

Fletch

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#39
Jesse... I know a guy that has a heating business and he may have a good wood burner in the shop... I gave him a shout, so see if he gets back to me.....
 
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