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DIY poison ivy relief

giles

Village idiot and local whore
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#1
For years I’ve told people about jewel weed for treating poison ivy and other skin irritants. This year while hiking I got the kids into some stinging needles and it worked on that too. Bee stings and just about anything I’ve tried it on, works.

It’s generally all around if you know what to look for. Right now in SW Ohio it is in bloom and very easy to spot with its little orange flowers.
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The edge of my yard is covered in these and it grows everywhere. Very common to grow near poison ivy.

I usually pull a plant from the ground, cut the main stem and rub it directly on the irritated skin.

What do you do in the winter/spring when you don’t have fresh plants around? Easy peasy! You take your lazy butt outside this time of year (when they are easiest to spot) and go harvest you some.

-Take some plants and uproot them. Cut them into pieces that’ll fit in a gallon ziplock bag and seal it up.

-Once you get home you start some boiling water.

-You can either chop on a cutting board or use a food processor to really chop it up.

-Add to boiling water and let it boil for 5 minutes or so.

-Let it cool.

-Poor into ice cube trays and freeze.

-Once frozen I put them back into that same ziplock bag I harvested the plant from. Because I’m cheap. Lol

Very easy process and this stuff works better than anything I’ve ever bought. I will likely make some in the next couple of days so if many are interested in the process I listed above, I can take pics.

Feel free to ask any questions or post what you use or do for skin irritants. Best thing about this is the kids, nothing worse than a kid with poison ivy. This generally only takes one application and the problem is gone!
 

Chass

Active Member
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The Hills
#5
Recently learned of this myself through a book I just finished. One of the many things the natives used. That got me digging around and looking up other medicines in our area as one was mentioned at being a close equal to our opium at the time for pain relief, and commonly carried to put into open wounds. Wasnt successful in finding what it was exactly but found abunch mors that you frequently see in the area.
 

giles

Village idiot and local whore
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#7
Recently learned of this myself through a book I just finished. One of the many things the natives used. That got me digging around and looking up other medicines in our area as one was mentioned at being a close equal to our opium at the time for pain relief, and commonly carried to put into open wounds. Wasnt successful in finding what it was exactly but found abunch mors that you frequently see in the area.
Looking into it a bit more, looks like it can even be used on sun burn. I’ve never tried that one. Maybe I’ll make a bigger batch this year.
 

giles

Village idiot and local whore
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#12
How well does it work on poison ivy/oak? Or does it just take the itch away?
I’ve never had poison oak, but usually one treatment and the poison ivy itch is gone. Rash dries out and goes away within a day if treated right away. The longer you have it before treating, the longer your skin takes to recover.
 
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MoonLab

Senior Member
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#13
Hmmm...this I'll have to try. I have to watch out for poison ivy. I'm allergic to em. If I get any on me, it will get bad. I would have to have shots. If this doesnt work, dave...you gotta shotgun 32 oz bud light and I wanna see it on video
 

CJD3

Dignitary Member
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NE Ohio
#16
I wrote something about this wonderful little plant on here years ago. The hummingbirds are attracted to the flower.
One of the coolest things about the plant is the way it spreads it’s seeds.
Very gently pull a large seed pod off the stem and slightly squeeze it. It’s spring loaded!
The slightest bump from anything will send several seeds in all directions.
Apon inspection, you’ll see a whitish spring looking stem inside the pod that launches the seeds. Very clever Mother Nature.