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Spencie

Active Member
2,261
651
60
Fleming
HUH???? Do what??? Whatever NO BIGGIE.... I think we are on the same page anyway's... On a side note: What the hell is wrong with them Penquins???
Too much success for the young players. The drive is not there now. Too bad because Sid is 110% heart. All out every second. They can turn it up if they want to. Hope they don't wait too much longer to do that.
 
Likes: Fletch
80
179
16
Nw oh
No doubt that Monday of gun season is nothing like it once was. Saturday of gun season seems about the same to me. Amazingly, Sunday is like it ain’t even happening. The entire thing has changed, some think that’s bad but imagine if had changed from what we have now to what we had in the 80s and 90s. Everyone would be crying about the woods being raped. Lol. Deer did not act right for a month after gun season back in the day. I like it the way it is today.
Well damn you were right. I've run cameras through rut and gun season at my place the last 8 years at least. I would have bet my paycheck I wouldn't get a picture of 1 deer the week after gun law day or night I'd go 2 or 3 weeks most years before getting night movement again. It used to be hard to see anything driving around for at least a week after orange. I'll definitely like it if it continues on this path...I stopped about 600 yards on the road from four this am the 3 does fed looking my direction not overly concerned. The buck busted ass back to cover instantly when I stopped. Good things to come in my mind...
 

Floki

Junior Member
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518
26
I think deer farms need to go before baiting with corn. Just my opinion. I may be wrong but there are tons of corn fields in the state. Does it make a difference if it’s a corn field or a corn pile?

If people are worried about CWD the deer farms should be the first bullet fired.

Disclaimer I put out corn every year. I have only killed one deer off of it in probably five years.(a doe)This year I havnt even went through a 100 lbs yet. The deer don’t even want it.

This whole corn thing/baiting will get worse in the coming years if the herd keeps on declining.

It’s the gun hunters, it’s the crossbow hunters, it’s corn piles, trail cams, poachers,leasers, ozonics, grunt tubes, scentlock, etc etc..

No it’s the DOW not having a structured plan.After all isn’t that who makes the rules???????? Or am I missing something?
 
Likes: Jal5

reo

Junior Member
487
3
26
N.E. Ohio
I think deer farms need to go before baiting with corn. Just my opinion. I may be wrong but there are tons of corn fields in the state. Does it make a difference if it’s a corn field or a corn pile?

If people are worried about CWD the deer farms should be the first bullet fired.

Disclaimer I put out corn every year. I have only killed one deer off of it in probably five years.(a doe)This year I havnt even went through a 100 lbs yet. The deer don’t even want it.

This whole corn thing/baiting will get worse in the coming years if the herd keeps on declining.

It’s the gun hunters, it’s the crossbow hunters, it’s corn piles, trail cams, poachers,leasers, ozonics, grunt tubes, scentlock, etc etc..

No it’s the DOW not having a structured plan.After all isn’t that who makes the rules???????? Or am I missing something?
They (DOW) made the plan. It has worked perfectly
 
Likes: Floki

OHIOOutdoors2

Active Member
1,567
559
46
Unknown
We talked about this in our group text this weekend. I said I support a ban on baiting and did so while talking out of the other side of my mouth as I dumped 300 #s of golden acorns. The only way I can compete on my 11 acres these days is to have the "smartest" bait pile. What was once pinch point and funnel heaven with no pressure (except me) on 200+ acres has been boiled down to 6-8 corn piles and 6-8 hunters. Just last week I drove "around the block" at last light and what do I see glowing on the hillside above the swamp that harbored many an old buck over the years? A corn pile the size of a Volkswagon. It was 300 yards off the road and I could see it plain as day. For 25 years, no one hunted anywhere near that spot and we (locals) only went in there to hunt rabbits or track deer. Now, that pile is one of at least 3 just like it on that 62 acres.

I'd much rather it be like the old days when the deer moved naturally and I could rely on our funnel being productive if I sat long enough. Now, deer don't need to travel through there because corn piles (and the pressure that comes with it) have completely altered deer movement back there. If I hope to compete, I need to offer them the most secure and "safe" source of food. My strategy today is no longer based on scouting and observation, it's based on my knowledge of our property (strengths and weaknesses), what others are doing, and how to manipulate the habitat/food to my advantage. It's still a chess game, but one that's been artificially interjected into my reality.

If you can't beat 'em, join 'em is where I've landed on the topic. What does it matter if I choose to not contribute to the increased chance of CWD transmission if a dozen other guys in our square mile are doing it? Ban it and I'll follow the rules. Until then, I'm playing the game within the rules, and with the cards I've been dealt.
It is unfortunate that guys who would prefer not to bait have to spend hundreds if not thousands of dollars to even get deer in front of them, their kids, what have you in an area where you used to be able to hunt natural movement. Not knocking those that bait, everyone has the right to enjoy their piece of the pie but it sure can ruin it for others. We have heard that above.

I am fortunate that the private I hunt has very limited number of baiters to my knowledge. So we still get natural deer movement.

No one legally can bait on the public but that doesn’t mean someone isn’t baiting 20 yds off the property line on private that impacts the deer movement. Just gotta find out who and use their pile to your advantage if the deer are coming off public!!😂Kind of sucks when you are hunting terrain and hike into there with a stand but the chase and the unknown of what could come walking by keeps drawing us back.
 
Likes: Isaacorps

Wildlife

Whitetail & Coyote Hunter
669
1,193
64
Ohio
The Ohio Division of Wildlife deer harvest numbers are posted each Wednesday throughout the hunting season.

A final report is also posted after the conclusion of the archery season.

The below harvest numbers are raw data that is dependent on three main factors: population levels, hunter participation, and regulations.

Click on the date below to see the to-date harvest totals.

2018-2019 Season

Harvest as of:


Source: http://wildlife.ohiodnr.gov/hunting...y-species/deer/deer-harvest-yearly-comparison
 
We talked about this in our group text this weekend. I said I support a ban on baiting and did so while talking out of the other side of my mouth as I dumped 300 #s of golden acorns. The only way I can compete on my 11 acres these days is to have the "smartest" bait pile. What was once pinch point and funnel heaven with no pressure (except me) on 200+ acres has been boiled down to 6-8 corn piles and 6-8 hunters. Just last week I drove "around the block" at last light and what do I see glowing on the hillside above the swamp that harbored many an old buck over the years? A corn pile the size of a Volkswagon. It was 300 yards off the road and I could see it plain as day. For 25 years, no one hunted anywhere near that spot and we (locals) only went in there to hunt rabbits or track deer. Now, that pile is one of at least 3 just like it on that 62 acres.

I'd much rather it be like the old days when the deer moved naturally and I could rely on our funnel being productive if I sat long enough. Now, deer don't need to travel through there because corn piles (and the pressure that comes with it) have completely altered deer movement back there. If I hope to compete, I need to offer them the most secure and "safe" source of food. My strategy today is no longer based on scouting and observation, it's based on my knowledge of our property (strengths and weaknesses), what others are doing, and how to manipulate the habitat/food to my advantage. It's still a chess game, but one that's been artificially interjected into my reality.

If you can't beat 'em, join 'em is where I've landed on the topic. What does it matter if I choose to not contribute to the increased chance of CWD transmission if a dozen other guys in our square mile are doing it? Ban it and I'll follow the rules. Until then, I'm playing the game within the rules, and with the cards I've been dealt.

Like I have said before, I am a novice when it comes to baiting. That being said I completely agree with your post. In PA where we have no baiting, I see more natural deer movement. In my limited baiting experientce, it seems to suppress daylight movement.
 

Wildlife

Whitetail & Coyote Hunter
669
1,193
64
Ohio

Posted by WB Reporters on Dec 8th 2018

Ohio Firearms Deer Harvest Per Square Mile By County - Where Does Your County Rank?
Much is made of the annual Ohio firearms season deer harvest by county total. We decided to dig a little deeper and rank all 88 counties by deer harvested per square mile. For the deer hunter wanting to put meat in his/her freezer this gives a true picture of where your absolute best odds are. Or in some cases are not!
Where does your county rank? Think of this in relation to what you think the deer density may be in your county. Do you think 10% of the herd is being harvested or could it be as high as 50%?


When we posted the harvest report by county there were many hunters posting about deer numbers being down. This may be true but when we see actual deer harvested by square mile it may help us manage our own property a little bit better! Should you shoot the extra doe or two or let them live? The more data we as deer hunters have the better we can become at managing our herd.





Below are what we feel are a few factors that do need to be discussed with officials from the ODNR:
1. Crop Damage Permits (Misused and abused by many!)
2. How we check in our deer! (how many deer were not even checked in this year?)
3. The effect of coyotes and bobcats on the deer population.
In the meantime we hope this chart will be enlightening and help you make better decisions! Just because I can eat an entire deep dish pizza does not mean I should do it!



Source: https://woodburyoutfitters.com/the-...Jrsame0ZXXzRmDzdK2sTGkM0weIjkFB5FlOVL7ULch-94
 
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Hunter groups talking to the ODNR in hopes that they would be receptive to taking actions to raise the statewide population numbers above current levels are most likely in for a disappointing outcome.They did implement regulation intended to benefit public hunting grounds for the 2018 season, but they seem to be pretty content to maintain the current levels after the current reduced populations were targeted and achieved.

I do agree, if that is your groups message, that hunters can effectively grow the deer population through education and personal restraint. The ODNR doesn't kill the deer, didn't kill the deer and won't kill them going forward. If hunters were ever able to collectively come together ( not much of chance of that) to reduce harvest, no matter what bags limits are established, to allow for a increase in population there is nothing the ODNR could do to stop the population growth. Hunters are the only tool in their tool box.
 

Wildlife

Whitetail & Coyote Hunter
669
1,193
64
Ohio
Nearly 10,000 Deer Checked during Ohio's Two-Day Gun Hunting Season
12/17/2018 Division of Wildlife

COLUMBUS, OH – Ohio’s hunters checked 9,625 white-tailed deer during Ohio’s 2018 two-day deer-gun hunting season, Dec. 15-16, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR). During last year’s two-day December deer-gun season, 14,115 deer were harvested.
Hunters still have opportunities to pursue deer this winter. Muzzleloader season is Jan. 5-8, 2019, and archery season remains open through Sunday, Feb. 3, 2019. Find more information about deer hunting in the 2018-2019 Ohio Hunting and Trapping Regulations or at wildohio.gov.
Past year’s harvest summaries and weekly updated harvest reports can be found at wildohio.gov/deerharvest.
For the first time this year, Ohio resident hunters can purchase multiyear and lifetime licenses at wildohio.gov and at hundreds of participating agents throughout the state. License buyers can choose from 3-year, 5-year, 10-year and lifetime hunting or fishing licenses. All money generated from the sale of multiyear and lifetime licenses is deposited into the Wildlife Fund, where it will be used to protect and enhance Ohio’s wildlife populations.
The ODNR Division of Wildlife remains committed to properly managing Ohio’s deer populations. The goal of Ohio’s Deer Management Program is to provide a deer population that maximizes recreational opportunities, while minimizing conflicts with landowners and motorists.

Hunting Popularity
Ohio ranks fifth nationally in resident hunters and 11th in the number of jobs associated with hunting-related industries. Hunting has a more than $853 million economic impact in Ohio through the sale of equipment, fuel, food, lodging and more, according to the National Shooting Sports Foundation’s Hunting in America: An Economic Force for Conservation publication.
ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.gov.

- 30 -

Editor’s Note: A list of all white-tailed deer checked by hunters using firearms during the 2018 two-day deer-gun hunting season is shown below. The first number following the county’s name shows the harvest numbers for 2018, and the 2017 numbers are in parentheses. Harvest numbers below are raw data and subject to change.
Adams: 131 (203); Allen: 55 (61); Ashland: 194 (342); Ashtabula: 368 (483); Athens: 170 (246); Auglaize: 66 (55); Belmont: 135 (264); Brown: 116 (172); Butler: 48 (66); Carroll: 224 (412); Champaign: 50 (75); Clark: 32 (48); Clermont: 95 (152); Clinton: 41 (58); Columbiana: 165 (367); Coshocton: 260 (512); Crawford: 82 (103); Cuyahoga: 5 (4); Darke: 49 (48); Defiance: 194 (152); Delaware: 71 (78); Erie: 58 (53); Fairfield: 85 (132); Fayette: 18 (22); Franklin: 10 (35); Fulton: 53 (60); Gallia: 120 (169); Geauga: 113 (111); Greene: 39 (51); Guernsey: 187 (307); Hamilton: 21 (55); Hancock: 89 (74); Hardin: 112 (110); Harrison: 175 (336); Henry: 86 (55); Highland: 142 (191); Hocking: 125 (199); Holmes: 211 (343); Huron: 178 (236); Jackson: 173 (191); Jefferson: 80 (197); Knox: 227 (382); Lake: 23 (40); Lawrence: 69 (91); Licking: 206 (340); Logan: 141 (169); Lorain: 159 (200); Lucas: 23 (13); Madison: 19 (52); Mahoning: 104 (194); Marion: 47 (79); Medina: 117 (188); Meigs: 160 (200); Mercer: 59 (47); Miami: 38 (54); Monroe: 120 (207); Montgomery: 20 (35); Morgan: 117 (214); Morrow: 88 (124); Muskingum: 206 (368); Noble: 132 (211); Ottawa: 20 (38); Paulding: 115 (113); Perry: 118 (213); Pickaway: 47 (62); Pike: 95 (114); Portage: 112 (201); Preble: 65 (82); Putnam: 54 (34); Richland: 222 (306); Ross: 127 (177); Sandusky: 54 (82); Scioto: 105 (184); Seneca: 147 (176); Shelby: 67 (75); Stark: 169 (287); Summit: 33 (41); Trumbull: 226 (321); Tuscarawas: 282 (497); Union: 49 (64); Van Wert: 60 (49); Vinton: 108 (201); Warren: 52 (66); Washington: 131 (213); Wayne: 127 (195); Williams: 168 (132); Wood: 69 (55); Wyandot: 102 (101). Total: 9,625 (14,115).

Source: http://wildlife.ohiodnr.gov/stay-in...cked-during-ohio-s-two-day-gun-hunting-season
 
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Have we ascertained the economic impact of the 2006-2011 slaughtering of our herd? Has to be a substantial decline in revenue tied to license and tag sales at this point.
The data that would provide the answer is" what are out of state hunter license sales". Are they declining? I think more resident hunters are choosing to cross bow hunt and do their "deer camp" (which I define as a out of town hunting trip which they stay at least once over night) during the pre rut/rut, instead of gun season "deer camp". Either way hotels, bars, restaurants, stores, etc are still making revenue just at a different time. A lot of different variables to your question.