Welcome to TheOhioOutdoors
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Login or sign up today!
Login / Join

2019-nCoV (Coronavirus)

Wildlife

Member
Supporting Member
3,320
137
USA
Why in the fuck would she resign. Make them fire her, claim unemployment, and file suit for damages under ADA due to an existing health condition and advice from her doctor. If she quits she can't do any of that. Better yet lawyer the fuck up right now.
Hey, that's what the wife just told not even 10 minutes ago. I agree with you and told the wife pretty much the same. So, we'll see what happens and I'll try to follow up on the situation.
 
Last edited:

Jackalope

Dignitary Member
Staff member
34,699
223
Right - some are ramping up the encouragement for vaccinations -
Kay Ivy had some tough words for the uncaccinated - dang

Oh no doubt she did. She's playing a dangerous game though saying it's time to blame the unvaccinated population, and that the unvaccinated are letting everyone down. It's never wise to whip up hate from 34% of the population and say they should blame the other 66% of the population in your state.

Here is what I find really interesting. There are less vaccinated people in Al than there are people who voted against her and for a democrat. 34% vaccination. 40% voted democrat. 36% voted for Biden to include 89% of African Americans.

So let's look at the numbers. The lack of vaccinations appears to be with the 18-49 age group of African Americans.

The Governor of Alabama better be careful blaming all those young African Americans and saying it's time to point the finger at them. Some old white lady in the deep south might find herself on the wrong side of that spin.

Screenshot_20210726-211523_Chrome.jpg


Screenshot_20210726-211435_Chrome.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mike

Wildlife

Member
Supporting Member
3,320
137
USA
Why in the fuck would she resign. Make them fire her, claim unemployment, and file suit for damages under ADA due to an existing health condition and advice from her doctor. If she quits she can't do any of that. Better yet lawyer the fuck up right now.
Got more insight of the story last night before I went to bed.

Apparently, the lady (wife's friend) said that she spoke to her boss about her concerns. Apparently, he said that people with religious or medical issues will be exempt from having to get the vaccine however, there are many that she works with hoping that their union will soon sue because the vaccines are still under the EAU and not officially FDA approved. It's a ongoing heated debate with many discussions on her FB page and there are several others that have chimed in stating that they will sue if terminated for refusing to get vaccinated. I get the impression that the VA support staff is becoming somewhat unglued over this entire issue and it appears to me that things have gotten quite political at their workplace.

So regardless, I do feel bad for all those that are facing that kind of dilemma today. The wife's friend is near the tail end of her work career and was intending on retiring in a few years, but now she's reconsidering that.

I will follow up with the wife from time to time just to see how this all plays out. I do not have FB so, I'll have to check in with her to get the latest information and updated details. I personally do not know the lady, the wife went to HS with her back in the day, but I am quite interested how this will effect her and others that provide care for veterans.
 
Last edited:

Ohiosam

*Supporting Member*
10,415
166
Mahoning Co.
Says I have too log in too view it, Sam….
me too now. Basically it talked about the government sending mixed messages: the vaccines are safe but we won’t give full approval in case they aren’t. It referenced the earlier mixed messages on masks. It blamed scientists and government health experts for causing much of vaccine hesitancy.
 

Wildlife

Member
Supporting Member
3,320
137
USA
me too now. Basically it talked about the government sending mixed messages: the vaccines are safe but we won’t give full approval in case they aren’t. It referenced the earlier mixed messages on masks. It blamed scientists and government health experts for causing much of vaccine hesitancy.

Here it is, I copied it for those interested in reading it.
_____________________________________

July 21, 2021

It is the most discordant part of the U.S. government’s response to Covid-19.
Even as President Biden, the C.D.C. and virtually the entire scientific community are urging — pleading with, even — Americans to get vaccinated, the government has not formally approved any vaccine. The Food and Drug Administration has instead given only “emergency use authorization” to the shots from Moderna, Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson. That’s a temporary form of approval that allows people to receive shots while the agency continues to study their effectiveness and safety.

The difference between emergency authorization and full approval matters. Right now, the military, schools and other organizations cannot easily require vaccinations. The “lack of F.D.A. licensure leave schools, colleges, businesses in a legal quandary,” Dr. Jerome Adams, a former surgeon general, recently wrote. Adams argued that lives were at stake and that the issue should be receiving more media coverage than it has.
The situation also feeds uncertainty and skepticism among some Americans who have not yet gotten a shot. Those skeptics, as Matthew Yglesias of Substack wrote yesterday, are effectively taking the F.D.A. at its word. The F.D.A. leaders’ official position is that “they don’t have enough safety data yet,” Yglesias noted.
The strangest part of all this is that the F.D.A.’s official position does not reflect its leaders’ actual views: They agree with the C.D.C. and other scientists that Americans should be getting vaccinated as soon as possible.
Dr. Janet Woodcock, the F.D.A.’s acting commissioner, has said that the F.D.A. “conducted a rigorous and thorough review” of the vaccines before allowing them to be given to people and that the Pfizer vaccine “meets F.D.A.’s high standards for safety and effectiveness.” She also said, “Getting more of our population vaccinated is critical to moving forward and past this pandemic.”

Hurry up and wait​

Why, then, hasn’t the F.D.A. taken the final step of formal approval?
It is following a version of its traditional, cautious process for vaccine approval. That process has historically had some big advantages, reducing the chances that Americans end up taking a faulty drug. To move much more quickly would risk undermining the public’s confidence in the F.D.A. and, by extension, the medicines it approves, Dr. Peter Marks, who oversees the process, has argued.
But I think the F.D.A.’s leaders have failed to understand how most Americans really think about the vaccines. It is different from the way that scientists and epidemiologists do. It’s less technical and based more on an accumulation of the publicly known facts.
It reminds me of another example of expert miscommunication, early in the pandemic. Back then, public health officials made highly technical statements about masks that many people interpreted as discouragement from wearing them. These statements ignored the many reasons to believe that masks could make a difference (like their longtime popularity in Asia to prevent the spread of viruses) and focused instead on the absence of studies showing that masks specifically prevented the spread of Covid.
Later, officials insisted that they were merely “following the data.” In truth, though, they were basing their advice on a narrow reading of the data — and not understanding how most people would interpret their comments.

The long wait to approve the vaccines is similar. F.D.A. officials are acting as if most Americans are experts in the nuances of their approval process and will be shocked if the agency expedites it. In reality, many Americans know almost nothing about that process. But some are understandably confused by the mixed messages that the F.D.A. is sending.
Hundreds of millions of people around the world have been vaccinated. Tens of thousands of them were followed for months in clinical trials. And F.D.A. officials have repeatedly urged other Americans to get vaccinated. “In the history of medicine, few if any biologics (vaccines, antibodies, molecules) have had their safety and efficacy scrutinized to this degree,” Dr. Eric Topol of Scripps Research wrote in The Times.
Yet the agency still has not given formal approval to those same vaccines.

Big costs, few benefits​

Think of it this way: In the highly unlikely event that the evidence were to change radically — if, say, the vaccines began causing serious side effects about 18 months after people had received a shot — Americans would not react by feeling confident in the F.D.A. and grateful for its caution. They would be outraged that Woodcock and other top officials had urged people to get vaccinated.
The combination means that the F.D.A.’s lack of formal approval has few benefits and large costs: The agency has neither protected its reputation for extreme caution nor maximized the number of Americans who have been protected from Covid. “In my mind, it’s the No. 1 issue in American public health,” Topol told me. “If we got F.D.A. approval, we could get another 20 million vaccinated,” he estimated.
Rebecca Robbins, who covers the vaccines for The Times, says she is less sure about the size of the impact. But she agrees that full approval, whenever it happens, is “probably going to be the catalyst for many new mandates.”
My colleague Noah Weiland says: “Right now, it appears a full approval for the Pfizer vaccine could come in September, with Moderna not far behind.”
In the meantime, more Americans may get sick from Covid. About 34 percent of Americans who are eligible for the vaccines have not yet gotten a shot. The number of new cases has roughly tripled this month, largely because of the Delta variant. The number of deaths has almost doubled in the past two weeks.
If you want to read the F.D.A.’s explanation, I recommend a letter Marks wrote to The Times: “We want to assure the public that the review of applications for full approval of Covid-19 vaccines is one of the highest priorities at the Food and Drug Administration.”
 
  • Like
Reactions: "J" and Ohiosam
Help me square this. Looks like I'll be starting back to school wearing a fucking mask 🤬🤬🤬....there have been a total of SEVEN children in Ohio that have died due to COVID in the year and a half during the pandemic. CDC recommends K-12 wear masks.
There are more children who die due to drownings. WHY isn't the CDC sounding the alarm and mandating that any child 0-17 wear a life vest anytime they enter the water?!? ....We would think they're effing nuts!...why are masks okay?
 

Wildlife

Member
Supporting Member
3,320
137
USA
Oh IDK, perhaps those that are pulling the strings ('Deep State') are rallying up all their tools and hoping to conditioning the masses once again with more propaganda fear porn for another round of election fraud cause the midterm election really isn't too far off in the distance.

The 2021 United States elections will be held, in large part, on Tuesday, November 2, 2021.

That would be my best guess, but hey, whom am I to think such things...
 

giles

Village idiot and local whore
Supporting Member
34,414
190
In a bar
Help me square this. Looks like I'll be starting back to school wearing a fucking mask 🤬🤬🤬....there have been a total of SEVEN children in Ohio that have died due to COVID in the year and a half during the pandemic. CDC recommends K-12 wear masks.
There are more children who die due to drownings. WHY isn't the CDC sounding the alarm and mandating that any child 0-17 wear a life vest anytime they enter the water?!? ....We would think they're effing nuts!...why are masks okay?
Just get in the box car...
 

Jackalope

Dignitary Member
Staff member
34,699
223
Wow.. Took them long enough. I mean to any idiot looking at examples where vaccinated people are required to undergo mandatory routine testing it was pretty obvious.


1627483118405.png



 

Jackalope

Dignitary Member
Staff member
34,699
223
  • Like
Reactions: OhioWhiteTails

Jackalope

Dignitary Member
Staff member
34,699
223
There is something REAL fuckey going on.... Look at this map.. There is very little correlation between vaccination rate reduction is hotspots.


1627484469108.png
 
  • Like
Reactions: OhioWhiteTails

Jackalope

Dignitary Member
Staff member
34,699
223
That's the funny thing about viruses. They adapt, or more correctly we adapt them in our bodies. They usually do so in a manner that allows them to get around whatever is causing them problems. So if we start screwing with the spike protien the virus is likely to adapt on the spike protein. The delta variant is a spike protien change. It's very natural. Everything from weeds, to grass, to bacteria does it. Spray roundup and weeds will eventually become roundup resistant. Hell, Roundup ready crops were discovered completely by accident when it was noticed that algae was thriving in the runoff pond at a Monsanto factory that was heavily polluted with roundup. The algae adapted, scientists isolated the gene and spliced it into crop plants like corn and soybeans.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mike
That's the funny thing about viruses. They adapt, or more correctly we adapt them in our bodies. They usually do so in a manner that allows them to get around whatever is causing them problems. So if we start screwing with the spike protien the virus is likely to adapt on the spike protein. The delta variant is a spike protien change. It's very natural. Everything from weeds, to grass, to bacteria does it. Spray roundup and weeds will eventually become roundup resistant. Hell, Roundup ready crops were discovered completely by accident when it was noticed that algae was thriving in the runoff pond at a Monsanto factory that was heavily polluted with roundup. The algae adapted, scientists isolated the gene and spliced it into crop plants like corn and soybeans.
Yep its a different virus now
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jackalope