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Covid vaccinations

We are pretty much saying the same thing. The 95% number they're shouting from the rooftops is a very specific point in time data point of peak efficacy. Yes the second dose indeed produces a 95% reduction. The question is "for how long". And it doesn't appear to be a question that anyone is eager to answer. They keep saying "we need more time" and "It's too early to tell". BS. The same test group that was sampled at 30 days to get that number 60 days ago can be sampled again now 90+ days later for antibody counts or infection. The first study that I've seen past 30 days is the one above and they're showing a pretty concerning drop down to 58% at day 42 after a single dose. With two doses to achieve the extra 15% efficacy does that drop to pretty meaningless numbers at the 60 or 90-day mark? I don't know and it's concerning that they're not being open with the data.
Yes, studies done before all the varients
 

Jackalope

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Yes, studies done before all the varients

Variants have no impact on immunization durability. A specific vaccine, for a specific variant, only has a finite immune effectiveness within the body. For example, a tetanus shot provides 96 effectiveness for 13-14 years, but tht dips to 72% at 25 years as such they recomend getting one every 10 years. The effectiveness of the mumps vaccine is 10 years before it starts to diminsh.

Flue vaccines change yearly because the virus adapts and a new vaccine are needed for new variants, however you are still protected from the original variant that you were immunized against for many many years.

Efficacy is how effective a vaccine is when measured at a specific point in time. Durability is a measure of efficacy over a period of time. So while the covid vaccine may have a 95% efficacy at 30 days, it may only be 70% at 1 year, and 40% at year two. We don't yet. I suspect we have a good idea that the short term durability isn't what we want to see, but we're purposefully not sharing that data because, well, we need people to get the shot, even if it's only effective for 3 months. Some of the studies that are slowly coming out are suggesting the durability is actually much less than that. (The image above) Meaning a yearly booster, or even more, will almost certainly be required. If the virus adapts to a variant that's unphased by the current vaccine, then they will need to develop a new one and offer it also, much like the flu vaccine. This will also vary by age group. Kids have a stronger immune system and immune memory than older adults. It's not uncommon for vaccines to be far less durable in older adults than kids.
 
Variants have no impact on immunization durability. A specific vaccine, for a specific variant, only has a finite immune effectiveness within the body. For example, a tetanus shot provides 96 effectiveness for 13-14 years, but tht dips to 72% at 25 years as such they recomend getting one every 10 years. The effectiveness of the mumps vaccine is 10 years before it starts to diminsh.

Flue vaccines change yearly because the virus adapts and a new vaccine are needed for new variants, however you are still protected from the original variant that you were immunized against for many many years.

Efficacy is how effective a vaccine is when measured at a specific point in time. Durability is a measure of efficacy over a period of time. So while the covid vaccine may have a 95% efficacy at 30 days, it may only be 70% at 1 year, and 40% at year two. We don't yet. I suspect we have a good idea that the short term durability isn't what we want to see, but we're purposefully not sharing that data because, well, we need people to get the shot, even if it's only effective for 3 months. Some of the studies that are slowly coming out are suggesting the durability is actually much less than that. (The image above) Meaning a yearly booster, or even more, will almost certainly be required. If the virus adapts to a variant that's unphased by the current vaccine, then they will need to develop a new one and offer it also, much like the flu vaccine. This will also vary by age group. Kids have a stronger immune system and immune memory than older adults. It's not uncommon for vaccines to be far less durable in older adults than kids.

Vaccines we have now may not be effective on varients is what I was implying and as you stated.
 

Jackalope

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Vaccines we have now may not be effective on varients is what I was implying and as you stated.

Thats the funny thing about viruses, Cat and mouse. When you try to stop them in one area they adapt. More appropriately, we adapt them for them. Antibiotics have saved countless lives, unfortunately the list of antibiotic resistant infections is on the rise. We'll never eradicate covid.
 
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hickslawns

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USA has spent over $6 trillion fighting covid so far - includes schools, and other things besides vaccine roll outs
Please don't bring that up. It just pisses people off. I'd be curious how much is truly going to the virus. Sure seems as though much of those monies are going to foreign countries and non-related virus stuff. Printing money in the name of the virus to fuel their pet projects and pad their pockets. Bull shit.
 
Please don't bring that up. It just pisses people off. I'd be curious how much is truly going to the virus. Sure seems as though much of those monies are going to foreign countries and non-related virus stuff. Printing money in the name of the virus to fuel their pet projects and pad their pockets. Bull shit.
Not privy to that information - most spent by previous admin but Biden catch n up
 
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hickslawns

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Not privy to that information - most spent by previous admin but Biden catch n up
I don't care who is in the Whitehouse. Took both parties in congress to spend it too. Just a nerve that got stepped on. Not mad at you Geezer. Just frustrating. I'm all for research, spending money to find a solution to the problem, etc. Not a fan of all the pork in these stimulus packages.