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Crossbow Lifespan?

Bowhunter57

Senior Member
3,316
107
Allen County
I recently purchased a Ravin R10 and a dozen Ravin 400 grain bolts. After getting it home, I was quick to purchase a block target so I could shoot either field tips or broadheads. Once getting the target, I sighted in the R10, as the manual suggests with no issues. I have since purchased limb vibration dampeners and the recommended lubricant for the strings and cables. (y)

I've done everything I can to protect my investment, to see that it lasts as long as possible. Having said that... I'm reading Ravin forums in various websites and there are a few owners that are shooting their R10 for the first time with the limbs and/or strings breaking and blowing up, during the sighting process. Less than 20 shots fired with this kind of breakage is NOT acceptable, to me. :mad: Especially, for the amount of money being paid for this type of equipment. I was looking forward to shooting this crossbow, quite a bit to get used to it at all yardages. I'm not shooting it, until after February 7th, when deer season is closed, in case something were to "fly off" of it and I couldn't get it repaired quick enough to finish the deer season. :rolleyes:

My questions:
Is this typical of faster crossbows?
Are 400+ fps crossbows at a higher risk for breakage?

Bowhunter57
 
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Sgt Fury

Sgt. Spellchecker
I heard that they had a bad batch of strings and that’s what’s causing the majority of the problems. Don’t know how you’d find out if your string is affected or not but maybe it would be a good idea to take it to a pro shop and get a custom string put on it.
 

Fletch

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
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Like J said: "Shoot it"... You never know, could explode on the first shot or last you a life time without a problem... Can't worry about it... Could be wrong but an archery shop last year told me they just changed strings on a xbow and it was over $250.00... I'll stick with my Centerpoint, was under $300.00 and shoots darts and has killed several great animals already... Starts giving me problems and I'll throw it in the garbage and buy another one... I still use my Martin compound also, so no biggie....
 
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triple_duece

Ragin Cajun.
7,229
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The video that the buck was shot w a ravin on my thread blew up on the owner. It happens w all bows and models. They fixed it right away and never looked back. Shoot it like you stole it. Years ago we used to run cotton balls on the limbs to check for splintering. Keep trash out the cams, string waxed and use it like it’s intended
 

Jackalope

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Whenever a company pushes the limits of technology the odds of bad things happening goes up. It's expensive to live on the bleeding edge of technology. Shoot it until it explodes and go from there, it may never explode. I'm sure the cost of warrenty repair was baked in to the product price.
 

xbowguy

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Supporting Member
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Licking Co. Ohio
Best answer to your question is "Depends on the one you got" I'd like to think the demand this year caused some of the problems. Flying off the shelves forced production to hurry the process somewhat. Could last a lifetime, could go to the shop soon. Shoot the bow Daniel. Keep an eye on any and all moving parts. Also all parts of your string. Use the Arrows and Nocks they recommend. Good Luck Buddy!
 

Bowhunter57

Senior Member
3,316
107
Allen County
I appreciate all the comments and advice, gentlemen! :)
I intend to maintain the crossbow as recommended. However, I'll not stop shooting it, once the season is over. I fully intend to know what it will do at the advertised yardages with the recommended Ravin arrows, string/cable lubricant and vibration dampeners.

In my opinion, the 100 yard range capability is more than I'll ever need or use. I'm going to email Ravin support and ask their advice on using 600 grain arrows vs. 400 grain. This will slow the arrow speed thus changing the trajectory, but will make it easier on the limbs by absorbing some of the energy. The factory stats of 142 lbs. of kinetic energy with 400 grain suggested arrows is nothing short of amazing, but at what cost to the limbs and strings? I guess I'll find out after I email them and get a response. :unsure:

Bowhunter57
 

Sgt Fury

Sgt. Spellchecker
Why you got to change up something that is designed for it. 🤷🏼‍♂️?
My guess is that a 400 grain bolt combined with the speed is pushing technology to the limits....using a 600 grain arrow will slow the bow down a bit but will also take some of the stress off of the limbs by absorbing the energy, thus making the bow a little safer and prolong its life.
 

Bowhunter57

Senior Member
3,316
107
Allen County
My guess is that a 400 grain bolt combined with the speed is pushing technology to the limits....using a 600 grain arrow will slow the bow down a bit but will also take some of the stress off of the limbs by absorbing the energy, thus making the bow a little safer and prolong its life.
Exactly my thoughts! (y)

Compound bows have been chasing the "holy grail" of speed for decades. It would appear that the crossbow manufacturers are taking their shot at it, now. It's being reflected in speed, accuracy and their price tags.

Bowhunter57
 

Sgt Fury

Sgt. Spellchecker
Anyone heard of a warranty?
14565B90-6C5E-4629-9826-C85EFD41D1F5.gif
 
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GoetsTalon

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Walbridge oh
I'd sell it and get a Excalibur then you wouldn't have to worry about shit. My crossbow is ten years old with the same string that came on it and will put them in the bull at fifty yards. I would never shoot at a deer that far with it. I sighted it in back then and have never had to adjust it. Strings never been off and the bow still shoots dead on. No power loss in the limbs. I researched then bought not bought then researched. Works better that way most times.
 
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Fletch

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Tell ya one thing for sure... I wouldn't take it out in sub zero temps... For sure would probably explode...
 
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GoetsTalon

Senior Member
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Walbridge oh
I know of one that blew hanging on the bow hanger about 20 feet up. Yeah the warranty is killer and they fixed it and she still hunts with it but dam I wouldn't never want to hold it cocked ever again.
 
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GoetsTalon

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Walbridge oh
Other benefits is you don't have to shoot it to uncock it plus no bow press to change strings and if you accidentally dry fire it for some reason the thing won't blow up in your hands. The only advantage with a crossbow is you don't have to move as much to shoot like drawing a bow. All the distances still apply. My max with a compound is 40 yards same for crossbow.
 
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