Welcome to TheOhioOutdoors
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Login or sign up today!
Login / Join

Shortwave/ham

Ohiosam

*Supporting Member*
10,174
146
Mahoning Co.
Any hams here? I’ve been intrigued with the idea since I was a kid but never real pursued it. The internet has overtaken radios a long time ago but the internet is too vulnerable.
What is a good receiver if a person just wanted to listen? What would be the minimum equipment for 2 way communications?
 
Any hams here? I’ve been intrigued with the idea since I was a kid but never real pursued it. The internet has overtaken radios a long time ago but the internet is too vulnerable.
What is a good receiver if a person just wanted to listen? What would be the minimum equipment for 2 way communications?
Check out the area amatuer radio clubs - several in this area
 

Wildlife

Member
Supporting Member
2,681
130
USA
Purchased these over a month ago during a flash one day sale. They seem to work better than what I originally anticipated. At this point, I seem to be satisfied with them.

20200908_161404.jpg


.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07VD9NY6N/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

Isaacorps

Member
3,575
94
Columbus
I had my license back when I was in high school but let it expire. I’d have to say the technology has advanced WELL beyond me being able to recommend anything. I enjoyed being able to key mic and never know who would respond on the other end and where, literally, in the world they were. I also built my own antennae so I enjoyed the technical aspect of it as well. Its an interesting niche of people for sure.
 

Outside

Junior Member
263
30
I'm a ham. If you want to get on the air using 'shortwave' (HF communications), then you need a table top kinda thing. I'd start with a used Heathkit, or Drake, or Icom or Yaesu radio. Most of them would be transceivers, but they listen fine. While technology has changed, most all of it is connected to 'controls'. The differences in receiver quality aren't noticable to the user. A 1970's heath kit HW101 radio has about the same sensitivity as a modern ICOM IC756Pro.


The BaoFeng UV5R's shown above are good radios, but are only designed for VHF (short distance).

if you want to 'try before buying', an easy place to start is one of the many on-line receivers you can access via the internet. try looking at websdr dot org. Pick a receiver anywhere, but ones in the US will be quicker to control. There are at least one Ohio based on-line receiver I know of.

If you want more information, I can drop you a DM by some method, or an email address.
 

Outside

Junior Member
263
30
Right now, we are at the 'low point' of the 11 year long sunspot cycle, so long distance communications is a little quieter, than it was six years ago. If you want to know 'who' or 'where' people are, there is a website for that TOO. dxsummit dot fi
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mike and Isaacorps

Isaacorps

Member
3,575
94
Columbus
Good info. I had a Yaesu FT840 back in the day. Saved my pennies thought I hit the lottery when I finally had enough to buy a used one. Coupled with a homemade dipole antenna strung through the trees in the back yard I was in business lol.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mike and Ohiosam

Outside

Junior Member
263
30
Good info. I had a Yaesu FT840 back in the day. Saved my pennies thought I hit the lottery when I finally had enough to buy a used one. Coupled with a homemade dipole antenna strung through the trees in the back yard I was in business lol.

They are good rigs. Lots of accessories TOO.

Universal Radio in Columbus has good used gear, all of which is pictured on their website. Easier than guessing over an EBAY deal, but the selection is smaller.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Isaacorps

Isaacorps

Member
3,575
94
Columbus
They are good rigs. Lots of accessories TOO.

Universal Radio in Columbus has good used gear, all of which is pictured on their website. Easier than guessing over an EBAY deal, but the selection is smaller.
Now you’ve got me wanting to scratch the itch lol. I think I still have some of my logs saved around here somewhere. It’d be interesting to revisit those
 

Outside

Junior Member
263
30
Delaware has a fairly active club, with VE's giving classes & exams. Im sure there are others. 'DAYTON" was cancelled this year, so a lot of people were left out. SARS-COV2 is a horrible bitch, isn't she?
 

Dannmann801

Senior Member
Supporting Member
9,882
136
Springboro
I got my ham license a couple of years ago, and am a member of the Dayton Area Radio Assn (DARA), the folks who put on "Hamvention" every year.
I've done some talking on the Baofeng, but haven't invested in the HF tabletop set yet. I can go to the club and access the HF equipment there with a coach, which was on my plan of things to do this year (fucking Covid). @Ohiosam But finding a club near you would be a great thing to do; HAM folk are anxious to help and coach new people, can help you pass the test and get on the air. It is a good culture.

KE8HAW
 

Outside

Junior Member
263
30
KE8HAW de NC2W/8

ARRL.org has a club locator tab open to anyone. Enter your zip code and a summary of each club, it's distance from you, and contacts are there. DARA is a good group of folks as well.
 

Ohiosam

*Supporting Member*
10,174
146
Mahoning Co.
I got my ham license a couple of years ago, and am a member of the Dayton Area Radio Assn (DARA), the folks who put on "Hamvention" every year.
I've done some talking on the Baofeng, but haven't invested in the HF tabletop set yet. I can go to the club and access the HF equipment there with a coach, which was on my plan of things to do this year (fucking Covid). @Ohiosam But finding a club near you would be a great thing to do; HAM folk are anxious to help and coach new people, can help you pass the test and get on the air. It is a good culture.

KE8HAW

i didn’t know there are clubs that shared equipment. Something to check out this winter
 

RedCloud

Super Moderator
Super Mod
16,905
149
Somewhere OHIO
20200913_125021.jpg

20200913_125101.jpg

20200913_125136.jpg

20200913_125205.jpg

20200913_125231.jpg

20200913_125257.jpg

I just had a small group of operators in the park over the weekend. They gave me the info I posted pics of. We had a traveling group in last year that try to pick a different park each year in the state to have an outing. I thought this group was the same as last year but they weren't. Didn't realize how popular it was to still chat on cb's and Ham radios. The one guy had an antenna strung between several trees about 40' up. Said he can do that just about anywhere in about 5 minutes using his spud gun to shoot lines over branches. Definitely a crowd of guys that will take time to teach you anything you want to know. It would also take some time to get use to these guys as well. Definitely not your everyday crowd lol.
 

Wildlife

Member
Supporting Member
2,681
130
USA
@Ohiosam

If you're at all a little bit tech savvy, there is software called 'Chirp' that makes it a snap to program/load everything that I care to have configured on my Baofengs.

If by chance you have a USB cable to connect the radio to most any computer, you can easily copy/paste whatever frequencies/lists that are available online. I have all the frequencies desired, such as FM radio stations, 911 Local Dispatch, Sheriffs, Ohio State Police, EMT, Fire, Airport, NOAA along with any other different type government critical agencies that I consider relevant for such a national and/or local emergency throughout my given area.

I really like the two Baofeng radios and haven't had any issues with them thus far. I have been using them regularly ever since I've had them over the past six months. I believe they'll be truly worth their weight in gold, especially should we ever loose the internet and/or all forms of telecommunications and/or cable television. The ranges have impressed me too!

How use the chirp software:

Chirp software download - https://trac.chirp.danplanet.com/chirp_daily/LATEST/

Good luck with yours!
 
Last edited: