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Take this job and shove it!

how often do you think about leaving your job?

  • once a year

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • once a month

    Votes: 3 17.6%
  • once a week

    Votes: 7 41.2%
  • once a day

    Votes: 1 5.9%
  • hourly, even on the fuggin weekend!!!

    Votes: 6 35.3%

  • Total voters
    17

bowhunter1023

Administrator
Staff member
46,815
249
Appalachia
Never is not an option and for the first time in my 17 year career, it's not something that's frequently on my mind. I had a rough stretch from my layoff in 2015 until I took my current position in March of 2020 and am very thankful to enjoy what I do. Not a lot of options for a guy like me with no hard skills, especially in this area, so I'm probably near/at the apex of my career trajectory and intend to ride it out for a while. But when I start having these thoughts, it won't be long until I take action on them. I've held 7 different job titles in 4 different sectors in 17 years, so I'm not afraid to make a change!
 
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"J"

Bass Whisperer
Supporting Member
48,877
249
North Carolina
I retired with 35 years doing the same thing and only thought about quitting one time. But with a family it wasn’t going too happen. I grew up when you worked at a job for life. Now there was upword mobility and I did progress through the promotions. But was happy with what I did and enjoyed it.
 

Spencie

Well-Known Member
4,483
128
Constitution Ohio
I’m only waiting for retirement. Being a chemical operator is not what I ever intended to be but it’s about as high a paying job as you can find in this valley.
Thanks to Joe and his band of Gypsies retirement gets farther away each time the stock market closes.
 

Sgt Fury

Sgt. Spellchecker
Once I got outta school I was always thinking about working as hard as I could and retiring early so that I’d have the time to do the things that I did while a teen. Now that I’m retired, I’ve found I have the time and money, but age is becoming a limiting factor. I’ve never really thought about quitting my job, but there was always a countdown clock ticking. After having a paper route as a kid, working as a dishwasher at a diner during my senior year of high school, 3 years in the Army, one year at a window factory, and almost 34 years at NJ Bell/Bell Atlantic/Verizon, I’ve retired (two months shy of my 56th birthday). I have a buddy who is going to work until he’s 67 so he will make money right up until he collects the maximum amount he can get in social security. I told him he’s nuts! I’ll already have been retired for 11 years before he retires and you can’t buy time. I’ve always believed that everyone should retire as early as they can…when you can afford to. You don’t want to retire too early then have to get another job making less money….but the moment you can afford to….RETIRE! Life’s too short and you need to enjoy it.
 
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aholdren

Senior Member
Supporting Member
5,070
132
South East Ohio
Pensions are a thing of the past, so the only thing keeping anyone to a retirement job is the amount of vacation time, and that is negotiable in a lot of jobs.
 

Bigcountry40

Member
3,553
93
I got absolutely no career help/advise from my parents as they were safe people who never really took risks or bet of themselves, my dad working a very low paying hard physical job. He retired at 60 and couldn’t be happier. Because of the Great Recession of 08, my wife and I struggled with finding decent employment while her parents criticized every decision/chance we took on ourselves. My father in law worked at GM as a journeyman machine operator (basically played on a computer), his wife and him never missed an opportunity to tell us how great his benefits, pay, etc were acting like those jobs still existed. My father in law just retired at 68 from almost dying from covid, he now is chained to his air tank and is basically is an old old man.
what I have learned from these contrasting lifestyles of my parents and in laws is, you only get one crack at this, family and joy first, fuck work, take sick days , leave early, come in late, go on as many trips as u can young, waiting for retirement may never come. My goal is to sign my house and land over to my kids and die in debt fuck it. If you don’t have debt or kids, stay poor and free as long as possible and then retire as soon as possible, none of us will ever say on our death bed “damn I wish I would of worked a little more for a raise” . I contemplate this work structure we have in the United States and other countries, I have friends that work 70-80 hours a week and I just don’t get it, sort of like people that save all their money waiting for an catastrophe and never enjoying their money. Railroaders are a perfect example literally never home because of work, make great money but can’t spend it because they work so much, and have a great retirement but you’ve basically worked the best days of your life away. What’s the point? I obviously know what the point is, the amount time, stress and energy we put towards work makes one think.
 

Jamie

Senior Member
4,644
137
Licking Co.
I don't see the option I need to cast a vote. "Never". They say that if you love your job you never work a day in your life. I beg to differ. I love my job and work my ass off. I enjoy the variety in my work. The pay is mediocre and my boss is an overbearing, self-serving dickhead. BUT, I get all the time off that I want to hunt, fish, forage build bows, cook, train dogs, etc. I have been doing all of my adult life what many people aspire to do when the retire. Freedom from "the man", beholden to no one, ever. I'm the luckiest college drop out you'll ever meet.
 

Mike

Dignitary Member
Supporting Member
14,476
176
Wood Co.
I quit a 25 year prison sentence last June. I'm self employed now with a small part time remote gig in the mornings. I'm much happier now even though this first year was rough mentally. I didn't think I'd make it, but here I am.
 

Bigcountry40

Member
3,553
93
This is a little off subject, with the current labor shortage, people have been able to negotiate better deals for themselves (vacation, remote, salary increase, etc). If another recession hits and job market flips back to Great Recession area job market, there might be a lot of unhappy workers, I remember how companies treated employees when finding work was a struggle. Hours were cut, pay cut, vacay cut, staffing companies screwing people over etc.
 

bowhunter1023

Administrator
Staff member
46,815
249
Appalachia
This is a little off subject, with the current labor shortage, people have been able to negotiate better deals for themselves (vacation, remote, salary increase, etc). If another recession hits and job market flips back to Great Recession area job market, there might be a lot of unhappy workers, I remember how companies treated employees when finding work was a struggle. Hours were cut, pay cut, vacay cut, staffing companies screwing people over etc.
My armchair economists view on this is it is unlikely that the job market will flip any time soon, maybe for a decade or more. The historically low workforce pool will take more than a recession to correct. Again, just my opinion. I know of companies in growth mode who can't get people and companies already in the recession who also can't get employees. It seems no company and no sector are immune from it. We're experiencing the early (and expected) retirements of Boomers, mothers exiting the workforce, and too much public money enabling lazy people right now and again, a recession is unlikely to totally overcome those deficits. What we're going to see is more automation and even more just-in-time delivery. The days of many hands making light work of massive inventory build ups are over, likely forever. In the manufacturing space anyways, which will also impact logistics and transportation. Meanwhile, Ohio has experienced 3 straight years of record new business starts and certain supply chains like food, are getting shorter. There's going to a shift to buying local that will create space for entrepreneurs, which will also alleviate the workforce strain for traditional sectors.

Let's face it, the world will never be the same and this is just the beginning of a new world economy, but that economy will have a robust local aspect to it IMO.
 

triple_duece

Ragin Cajun.
7,877
144
Not often 😂
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jagermeister

Dignitary Member
Supporting Member
17,260
187
Ohio
Hourly, even on the weekends.

Not at all because I dislike my job. I love my job. But my brain doesn’t allow me to be happy with one thing or another. I have a tragic disability that consumes me, forcing me to constantly dream and speculate about new career paths and new ventures. I simply can’t turn it off. Alcohol doesn’t work. In fact, I think it only makes it worse. Weed would probably help… but that is frowned upon by by employer and my CDL endorsement. 😂